Life Mothers & Babies

Wednesday 19 September 2018

Does freezing eggs actually work?

Apple and Facebook in the United States have offered female workers egg-freezing as a health plan benefit
Apple and Facebook in the United States have offered female workers egg-freezing as a health plan benefit
Eilish O'Regan

Eilish O'Regan

It wins the award as most unusual office perk of 2014 - and it may yet catch on in Ireland.

The decision of Apple and Facebook in the United States to offer female workers egg-freezing as a health plan benefit sparked worldwide debate.

The idea is that these young women freeze their eggs in their most fertile years to allow them concentrate on their careers. If they want a family later on, the eggs are in storage.

So what do fertility experts in Ireland think? Dr Ahmed Omar, medical director of the Beacon CARE Fertility in Dublin said: "We are seeing more and more Irish women enquiring about the option of egg freezing .

"Freezing eggs at an early reproductive age can help to preserve fertility and maximise the chance of a future pregnancy. It is important to note that there can be risks and no guarantee it will result in a successful future pregnancy."

Dr John Waterstone, medical director of Cork Fertility Centre said: "It remains the case that no clinic in Ireland and very few in the UK, have frozen eggs, thawed them, and produced a baby after fertilising them.

"Only about 20 babies have been born in the UK to date. Whatever the wisdom of social egg freezing, pragmatically any woman who spends money on egg-freezing in Ireland today is likely to be throwing that money away.

"A treatment may be theoretically possible to carry out but statistically very unlikely to be successful."

Health & Living

Life Newsletter

Our digest of the week's juiciest lifestyle titbits.

Editors Choice

Also in Life