| 11.5°C Dublin

Close

Premium

‘Men would definitely like to be at home more now.’ Has the pandemic changed the role of Irish fathers?

Working from home with schools and creches closed for long stretches, the Covid-19 pandemic has meant that many working dads are now much more involved in child-rearing and domestic chores than before. It’s a challenging but rewarding situation, and one that could signal the start of a cultural shift for Irish fathers

Close

Jeweller Nigel O'Reilly with his children Tadhg, left, and Davitt

Jeweller Nigel O'Reilly with his children Tadhg, left, and Davitt

From right to left, Conor Lantry with sons Harry and Ollie and his wife Sarah Rickard

From right to left, Conor Lantry with sons Harry and Ollie and his wife Sarah Rickard

Seamus Sheedy, Vice chair of the Irish Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy

Seamus Sheedy, Vice chair of the Irish Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy

/

Jeweller Nigel O'Reilly with his children Tadhg, left, and Davitt

A Scandinavian sensibility has been influencing how we dress and style our homes for years, but it looks like, post-pandemic, we may begin to see Nordic influences transform more than just our aesthetics. In countries such as Sweden – the first in the world to introduce paid parental leave in 1974 – working fathers take anything up to seven months’ professional leave after a baby is born.

Rather than scaring them off back to their white-collar worlds or serene creative hubs, it’s well documented that, in fact, it encourages fathers to remain engaged in parenting at a deeper level and more involved in domestic chores even after they return to work.


Most Watched





Privacy