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Family time: How to cope with 'house arrest' as enforced isolation becomes more common during coronavirus crisis

Two weeks' enforced isolation may seem like a long time, but there are things you can do to keep your mind - and the kids - healthy and happy

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The great outdoors: Spend time in the garden if you have one

The great outdoors: Spend time in the garden if you have one

The great outdoors: Spend time in the garden if you have one

St Patrick's day is off. The whole of Italy is in quarantine. And over the water in the UK, the government may soon be requesting that anyone displaying so much as a sniffle lock themselves away from the outside world.

Better make sure that your internet connection is reliable. Because we are entering a phase of coronavirus containment where at any moment, any one amongst us could find ourselves faced with a whole two weeks of enforced Netflix and chill.

The prospect of self-isolation means different things to different people. If you are lucky enough to be, for example, a public sector worker, 14 days during which you will be paid to mooch around in pyjamas and eat biscuits sounds like no great hardship. For self-employed journalists like myself, being shut up indoors with mostly just a laptop screen for company, is simply business as usual. But for the elderly who might already be suffering from loneliness, or parents with young families who are cooped up at home with the kids and forced to avoid the usual winter-time saviours of cinemas, swimming pools and soft play, the idea of quarantine could seem nigh-on unendurable.