Sunday 25 February 2018

'Prayers answered' - Tiny Dancer Lily-Mae marks three years cancer-free at First Holy Communion

Lily-Mae celebrates her First Holy Communion; (inset) pictured in Crumlin Children's hospital in 2013
Lily-Mae celebrates her First Holy Communion; (inset) pictured in Crumlin Children's hospital in 2013

Nick Bramhill

The mother of 'Tiny Dancer' Lily-Mae Morrison has said her prayers have been answered as she prepares to celebrate her daughter's First Holy Communion.

Nine-year-old Lily-Mae is winning her battle against cancer, having remained free of the disease for the past three-and-a-half years.

Lily- Mae Morrison pictured in 2013 at Crumlin Children' s Hospital
Lily- Mae Morrison pictured in 2013 at Crumlin Children' s Hospital

Mum Judith Sibley said the Galway girl's communion tomorrow marks "a massive milestone" she feared she might never reach.

"Tomorrow will be such a huge celebration of Lily-Mae's life and no doubt I'll cry the whole way through," she said.

"Like any little girl, Lily-Mae can't wait to put on her dress and be the centre of attention for the day.

"It will also be a reflective period for us, because it's taking place just days before the fifth anniversary of her diagnosis with stage four neuroblastoma.

Lily-Mae celebrates her First Holy Communion
Lily-Mae celebrates her First Holy Communion

"At the time, she had just a 30pc chance of survival, so we know she's very lucky.

Emotional

"It will be a very emotional day, and it will also be a day when I think of the parents and friends who I've met over the past few years who haven't been so lucky."

Lily-Mae captured the hearts of the public in 2012 with the release of a charity cover of Elton John hit Tiny Dancer.

Lily Mae Morrison celebrates being cancer free
Lily Mae Morrison celebrates being cancer free

She went on to receive nine chemotherapy treatments, and most recently completed a clinical trial in the US.

Although she is in remission, Judith says she will never become complacent.

"I will always have a worry at the back of my mind that it could return," she said.

"The relapse rate for neuroblastoma is extremely high, and I've met far too many families who have lost their children to this horrendous disease."

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