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Can cash cling on? Why its future is touch and go

Covid may have fast-forwarded the demise of notes and coins by at least five years, but not everyone is enamoured with a cashless future

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Covid failed to push cash over the edge, but time may be running out for notes and coins

Covid failed to push cash over the edge, but time may be running out for notes and coins

‘I don’t think there’s any going back’: Ruth and Stephen Deasy who own Bear Market Coffee at their Westland Row outlet in Dublin. Photo by Steve Humphreys

‘I don’t think there’s any going back’: Ruth and Stephen Deasy who own Bear Market Coffee at their Westland Row outlet in Dublin. Photo by Steve Humphreys

Kate Verling: "Most people were moving away from cash in big numbers"

Kate Verling: "Most people were moving away from cash in big numbers"

Rugby player and reality TV star Greg O'Shea in Ireland’s first-ever completely frictionless store, Market x Flutter. Photo by Julien Behal

Rugby player and reality TV star Greg O'Shea in Ireland’s first-ever completely frictionless store, Market x Flutter. Photo by Julien Behal

‘There is a cost to being cashless’: Louisa Cameron of Raven Books in Blackrock, Dublin. Photo by Caroline Quinn

‘There is a cost to being cashless’: Louisa Cameron of Raven Books in Blackrock, Dublin. Photo by Caroline Quinn

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Covid failed to push cash over the edge, but time may be running out for notes and coins

Kate Verling had long dreamed of turning her nail bar business into a completely cashless one. When the pandemic struck, she got her chance.

Like all salons, her Dublin-based hand and foot spa, Mink, had to shut its doors during the most severe Covid restrictions, but when reopening was permitted in June 2020, she decided to walk away from cash for good.


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