Thursday 16 August 2018

Women twice as likely to face discrimination

'New analysis found that issues of pay and promotion for women were frequently raised' (stock photo)
'New analysis found that issues of pay and promotion for women were frequently raised' (stock photo)

Ed Carty

Women are twice as likely as men to face discrimination at work, research has revealed.

New analysis found that issues of pay and promotion for women were frequently raised.

Leading think-tank the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) said almost one in eight people in Ireland had reported some experience of discrimination in the past two years.

Lead author Frances McGinnity said: "Discrimination can be damaging to the individuals who experience it, in terms of their self-esteem, well-being and for their material outcomes, such as their income and access to valued positions and services.

"There are also costs at a societal level.

"Discrimination in the labour market may be economically inefficient, as the skills of individuals are not effectively used.

"Discrimination can also undermine social cohesion."

Travellers face the worst discrimination and are almost 10 times more likely to be discriminated against when looking for work.

People with a disability were found to be more than twice as likely to be discriminated against.

The ESRI said black people in Ireland were three times more likely to experience discrimination in the workplace and in access to public services, and more than four times more likely to experience discrimination in access to private services.

The research was carried out with the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission.

Irish Independent

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