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Why it pays to ask questions when buying a used car

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Caution: Buying a used car privately can be a minefield of potential problems

Caution: Buying a used car privately can be a minefield of potential problems

Caution: Buying a used car privately can be a minefield of potential problems

One thing you should never forget about buying a used car, especially privately, is that a seller doesn't always volunteer information.

In two recent instances, with which I am familiar, the answer was forthcoming only when I pressed hard. Except it wasn't the full answer.

For that, the potential buyers I was helping had recourse to one of the excellent car-history check websites. In both cases there was an alert that the cars had been involved in crashes more severe than the vendors' play-it-down explanation might have suggested.

One had been off the road for a year. Both were extremely well priced. Too good to be true? The chances are that if something seems to be an unbeatable bargain there is a reason for it.

I'm all for getting the best deal you can but if you have a doubt the chances are you're right to have one.

Don't forget you have far better recourse if something goes wrong with a car you buy from a reputable dealer. You may have to pay a few hundred euro more. I think it can be well worth it. I know two more people who now think so as well.

SKODA is bringing in the 2pc VAT reduction a month early on all its models.

The Government's 2pc cut was announced as part of a stimulus package and is due to come into effect on September 1.

But Skoda decided to make the reduction effective from August 1.​​​​

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