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What Generation Z thinks about the world they will inherit

Youngsters will be taking to the stage next week at a World Children’s Day event to address the issues they are most passionate about. Édaein O’Connell hears from some of the speakers about their hopes and fears

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Ella O' Donoghue Concannon on her parents' land in Co Galway. Photo by Ray Ryan

Ella O' Donoghue Concannon on her parents' land in Co Galway. Photo by Ray Ryan

Molly and Bobby Chapple want parents to loosen their grip

Molly and Bobby Chapple want parents to loosen their grip

Precious Rukundo, who started a baking business during the pandemic while living in direct provision. Picture by David Conachy

Precious Rukundo, who started a baking business during the pandemic while living in direct provision. Picture by David Conachy

Student Anjelica Foley from Arklow, Co Wicklow. Photo by Steve Humphreys

Student Anjelica Foley from Arklow, Co Wicklow. Photo by Steve Humphreys

Darragh Cahill is going to talk about what it is like to live with scoliosis in Ireland

Darragh Cahill is going to talk about what it is like to live with scoliosis in Ireland

‘We want action’: Dariusz Konefal will be talking about climate change. Picture by Shelley Corcoran

‘We want action’: Dariusz Konefal will be talking about climate change. Picture by Shelley Corcoran

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Ella O' Donoghue Concannon on her parents' land in Co Galway. Photo by Ray Ryan

‘Children should be seen and not heard” is an expression we might associate with the Victorian era, but how much do we really listen to them today?

Today’s youngsters are confronted with a range of problems and challenges that previous generations could scarcely imagine: peer pressure on social media, accelerating climate change and, of course, the after-effects of the Covid pandemic. Many are engaged socially, culturally and politically from a young age. So what do they think about the world they will inherit?


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