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'We are not bad people, we didn't do anything wrong' - Pamela Flood after €1.2m debt deal

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Difficult year: ‘I would rather if people disliked me for the bad things I had done, but not the things I haven’t, not for lies,’ said Pamela Flood. Photo: David Conachy

Difficult year: ‘I would rather if people disliked me for the bad things I had done, but not the things I haven’t, not for lies,’ said Pamela Flood. Photo: David Conachy

Difficult year: ‘I would rather if people disliked me for the bad things I had done, but not the things I haven’t, not for lies,’ said Pamela Flood. Photo: David Conachy

Pamela Flood has admitted 2019 was the worst year of her life after her lengthy court battle with a vulture fund.

In October last, she and husband Ronan Ryan won a High Court appeal against a possession order granted for their house on Mount Prospect Avenue, Dublin.

Last week it emerged the couple have agreed to sell their family home in Clontarf as part of a deal hammered out with Tanager vulture fund.

Speaking for the first time since the deal was signed, Ms Flood said the last year and a half had been extremely difficult for her and her family.

"The last year and a half or so [were tough] but I hope that in the last year or so that people, without going into too much detail, understand a little better than the fibs that were told last year.

"And that people get it and realise that we are not bad people and that we didn't do anything wrong.

"And look, no one is a saint and no one is an angel. I would rather if people disliked me for the bad things I had done, but not the things I haven't, not for lies.

"Last year has been the worst year of my life for obvious reasons but we learn from things and perspective is your friend.

"It is all good now."

The house has now been put on the market with an asking price of €695,000.

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While they will sell the property, they will continue to run their popular catering business Counter Culture.

According to court documents, the brokered agreement will eliminate the €1.2m mortgage debt the couple currently owe to the fund.

There has also been a stipulation put in place to put the couple in a position to downsize to a new home.

During the possession proceedings in 2019, it emerged that the couple had not made any mortgage payments on the home for years.

While the decision to stop repayments was the result of an agreement reached between the couple and the Bank of Scotland, there was a lot of outrage expressed at the time on social media.

In an Instagram Live post, Ms Flood said that her celebrity made the ordeal worse. "What should be private is not private and I think that is really wrong," she said.

"That's an obvious downside. There are upsides too.

"Sometimes you are in the middle of Aldi or Dunnes and some people come up and say they loved the show and they miss myself and Caroline [Morahan] and that is lovely."

Last week, Mr Ryan revealed an agreement had been reached which both sides in the court dispute were happy with. "It is a huge weight off our minds," he said.

A courtroom battle had been looming between the fund and the one-time proprietor of Town Bar & Grill after he last year consented to a possession order for the Dublin property, only to institute personal insolvency proceedings at the last minute after having a change of heart.

Mr Ryan (49) had been seeking court approval for an arrangement writing off €634,000 of his debts of €1.6m while keeping the family home.

But the agreement with Tanager means the matter will no longer proceed.

"It was all amicable," said Mr Ryan. "They are happy, we are happy, and it is being sold."

Mr Ryan was a successful restaurateur during the Celtic Tiger years and in 2008 he met Ms Flood, a former Miss Ireland who presented several shows including 'Off The Rails'.


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