Wednesday 25 April 2018

Warnings of heavy rain raise fears in areas hit by floods

The warning comes just eight days after Storm Eleanor left much of Galway city and Limerick under water. Photo: PA
The warning comes just eight days after Storm Eleanor left much of Galway city and Limerick under water. Photo: PA
Allison Bray

Allison Bray

Areas hit by devastating floods just over a week ago could be mopping up again this morning after Met Éireann issued a Status Yellow rainfall warning.

The warning, issued from 4pm last night to 4am this morning, covers all of Munster and Co Galway, and could see spot flooding and up to 40mm of rainfall by dawn.

It warns of showers merging to longer spells of thundery rain with "surface water and spot flooding likely with between 25 to 40mm possible".

This comes just eight days after Storm Eleanor left much of Galway city and Limerick under water when winds of up to 130kmh, coupled with high tides, caused widespread coastal flooding.

A Met Éireann forecaster last night warned that the same areas that were submerged by the storm could be flooded again.

"The ground is so saturated so anything could lead to further flooding," she told the Irish Independent.

Some Met Éireann weather stations were already reporting heavy rainfalls by teatime last night, with Sherkin Island in Cork recording 14mm and Cork Airport 11mm in just four hours.

The heavy rain was to be most persistent in the western half of the country overnight, but clearing to isolated showers by this morning. Although it will be drier in the east and north today, driving conditions could be hazardous with overnight frost and lingering fog this morning.

Today may even see the sun break through, but any reprieve from the rain will be short-lived as another band of heavy rain is expected along Atlantic coasts tomorrow morning, with some heavy bursts along the western and south-western coastal counties by afternoon and evening.

There is also a renewed threat of more spot flooding during widespread heavy rain tomorrow night, according to Met Éireann.

Meanwhile, flood defences for the most vulnerable parts of Cork will be fast-tracked as the city aims to enhance its claim to be the 'Venice of the North'. A key element of the city's €140m flood protection plans will be to enhance Cork's use of its quays and riverside walkways. The plans will include a three metre-wide walkway along the length of Morrison's Island, and the removal of car parking from some areas.

Irish Independent

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