Monday 20 November 2017

Teacher strikes behind most of the 71,647 days lost last year

A total of 71,647 days were lost due to industrial action in 2016, compared with 32,964 the
previous year (Stock picture)
A total of 71,647 days were lost due to industrial action in 2016, compared with 32,964 the previous year (Stock picture)

Anne-Marie Walsh

Teacher strikes accounted for most of more than 71,000 days that were lost due to industrial action last year.

A total of 71,647 days were lost due to industrial action in 2016, compared with 32,964 the previous year.

The Central Statistics Office said two disputes in the education sector accounted for 76pc of the days lost last year, or 54,562 of the total.

In all, there were 10 disputes last year involving 29,372 workers compared with nine in 2015 involving 37,760 employees.

Meanwhile, a new survey of salaries reveals that the average pay increase - at 2pc - is still modest.

The Facilitas Group, which conducted the survey, said the average wage increase had remained the same for three years in a row.

The group, which is made up of seven recruitment specialist firms, said 42pc of those surveyed said they would recruit more staff this year.

Mark Staunton, CEO of the Facilitas Group, said that while much-needed healthcare professionals were leaving the country because their pay had diminished, there had been an increase in senior executives returning to the country.

"Recruiting and retaining key people is a growing challenge for companies and we are seeing this particularly across healthcare, hospitality and ICT," he said.

Mairead Fleming, managing director of Ascension Executive Recruitment, said pay rises were extremely important, but staff were demanding extra benefits. Popular items include pensions, healthcare and bonuses, but other benefits that were on offer during the boom years are reappearing.

Perks that can seal a job offer include gym membership and free lunches. An increased holiday entitlement is also very popular as well as flexible working options, including the ability to work from home.

The survey found chief executives of not-for-profit companies were earning between €80,000 and €130,000 and chief executives in industry between €130,000 and €300,000.

Human resource managers command wages of up to €90,000, office managers up to €60,000, head chefs up to €50,000 and junior doctors up to €45,000.

Irish Independent

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