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Tuesday 22 October 2019

Stalker, who led 'shoot to kill' inquiry in the North, dies at 78

  

John Stalker: Spent two years on inquiry into RUC in Northern Ireland. Picture: PA
John Stalker: Spent two years on inquiry into RUC in Northern Ireland. Picture: PA

Pat Hurst

John Stalker, the British policeman who led an inquiry into 'shoot to kill' allegations in the North, has died aged 79.

Manchester-born Mr Stalker served as an officer for more than three decades, rose to the rank of Deputy Chief Constable and led the policing inquiry in Northern Ireland which became known as the Stalker Inquiry.

In 1978 - at the age of 38 - he was appointed head of Warwickshire CID, the youngest Detective Chief Superintendent in the UK, later becoming Deputy Chief Constable of the Greater Manchester Police in 1984, the biggest British police force outside of London.

During his time as a police officer Mr Stalker travelled around the world studying terrorism and crime in Europe, the USA and South America. In 1982 he worked for two years in Northern Ireland, investigating an alleged state "shoot to kill" policy targeting members of the Provisional IRA.

After his retirement in 1987 he carved out a new career as a journalist and pursued his passion for writing.

He presented the series 'Crime Stalker' on Central Television for six years.

His death was announced by his eldest daughter, Colette Cartwright, in a statement paying tribute to a "beloved husband, grandfather and great-grandfather who enriched the lives of many".

Irish Independent

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