Friday 20 July 2018

Stab victim Omar (3) laid to rest after 'final kiss' from father

An emotional Khalid Omran (far right), the father of three-year-old Omar Omran who died in a stabbing tragedy in Dublin last week, helps carry his son’s remains outside the mosque in Clonskeagh. Photo: Steve Humphreys
An emotional Khalid Omran (far right), the father of three-year-old Omar Omran who died in a stabbing tragedy in Dublin last week, helps carry his son’s remains outside the mosque in Clonskeagh. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Alan O'Keeffe

Little Omar Omran was bade a loving farewell at his funeral yesterday, eight days after his death from multiple stab wounds.

The three-year-old boy received a final kiss from his father Khalid Omran as he was laid to rest.

His body, wrapped in a white shroud, was lifted from the small white coffin and placed gently in the grave in an Islamic ceremony.

He was brought to the Islamic section of Newcastle Cemetery, in Co Dublin, following prayers at Clonskeagh mosque.

His mother, Iraqi GP Dr Maha Al-Adheem (42), has been charged with the murder of Omar at their home at Riverside Apartments in Kimmage, Dublin, on July 10.

Dublin District Court was told the mother replied, when charged with murder: "Yes, it was my knife. Yes, it was my hand. It wasn't me, it was the power." She was remanded in custody.

The boy's father, who arrived in Ireland last Tuesday from Iraq, was accompanied by his brother.

The imam at Clonskeagh mosque, Dr Hussein Halawa, said later that the ceremony involved the body being washed in the Islamic way in the morgue at the mosque. The body was then wrapped in a white shroud before being placed in a coffin.

In the prayer hall there was "praying to God to admit him into paradise" and "to grant his family patience," he said.

"I know the feeling of his father at this time," said the imam, explaining how he himself had lost a three-year-old son 40 years ago.

Omar's death was "a very painful incident and it is causing pain to the father and the Muslim community and I'm sure anybody in Ireland who would hear about this incident would share the same suffering.

"It's an issue for all humans regardless of their religion.

"Everybody will be sympathising," he said.

"Omar used to come (to the mosque) with his mother. The father prayed here a number of times," he said.

Irish Independent

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