Tuesday 15 October 2019

Shake-up at RTE

STAFF at RTE will be briefed on Monday on a re-organisation of RTE One and RTE Two, as two new channel controllers take up their posts.

George Dixon, a former executive at Channel Four, will become the channel controller of RTE One, while Bill Malone, who was the commissioning editor at the national broadcaster for the last two years, will take up the corresponding post at RTE Two.

WORKERS at a waste water treatment plant have returned to work following a three-day strike over pay.

The 12 technical operatives at the Shanganagh plant in south Dublin voted unanimously to accept proposals from the Labour Relations Commission to put in place sick pay and pension schemes.

DOG MICRO-CHIP ADVICE

THE Government is seeking advice from "interested or knowledgeable parties" on the micro-chipping of dogs. The invitation follows the passing of the Animal Health and Welfare Bill. The bill makes microchipping of all dogs mandatory by 2015.

Interested individuals and organisations should make submissions before June 21, 2013, to Dog Microchipping Initiative, Animal Health and Welfare Division, 4C, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Agriculture House, Kildare St, Dublin 2.

CHINESE HEALTH VISITOR

HEALTH Minister James Reilly bade 'ni hao' and a warm welcome to his Chinese counterpart, Li Bin, to Ireland. The Chinese health minister and her delegation were in Dublin at the invitation of Mr Reilly, who led an Irish trade mission to China last August.

The two ministers and their officials gathered in Leinster House to share their experiences of health reform. After the meeting, the Chinese group were brought on a visit to St Vincent's Hospital.

APOLOGY

In an article in our edition of 25 January, 2013, we stated that a junior hospital doctor, identified in the article as Karen, had claimed on RTE's 'Liveline' radio programme that the stress caused by her job had contributed to problems that led to the death of her baby daughter, Lily.

Solicitors for the doctor have contacted us to point out that this was incorrect and that the content of their client's telephone call to the 'Liveline' programme had been taken out of context.

We wish to apologise to the doctor for the distress caused to her by the inaccuracy in our article. We wish to confirm that the tragic death of her daughter was not in any way related to work stress and to acknowledge her professional reputation, standing and dedication.

Irish Independent

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News