Wednesday 21 February 2018

Ross Kemp joins Belfast Twelfth of July parade for new series of Extreme World

Ross Kemp filming for his new 'Extreme World' TV series at Ardoyne shopfronts in North Belfast where an Orange Order parade was about to pass today.
Pic: Alan Lewis
Ross Kemp filming for his new 'Extreme World' TV series at Ardoyne shopfronts in North Belfast where an Orange Order parade was about to pass today. Pic: Alan Lewis
A Loyalist protester gestures to the police in the Woodvale Road area of North Belfast, July 14, 2013, on the third night of unrest after an Orange Parade was blocked from marching past the Nationalist Ardoyne area. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton
Loyalist protesters confront the police in the Woodvale Road area of North Belfast, July 14, 2013, on the third night of unrest after an Orange Parade was blocked from marching past the Nationalist Ardoyne area. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton
Loyalists clash with police in the Woodvale Road area of North Belfast, on the second night of violence after an Orange Parade was blocked from marching past the Nationalist Ardoyne area in Belfast, July 13, 2013. More than 30 police officers were injured and 11 people arrested during overnight violence around traditional Orange Day parades in Northern Ireland, authorities said on Saturday. Thousands of pro-British Protestants march every summer in the British province, a regular flashpoint for sectarian violence as Catholics, many of whom favour unification with Ireland, see the parades as a provocation. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton
Loyalists clash with police in the Woodvale Road area of North Belfast, on the second night of violence after an Orange Parade was blocked from marching past the Nationalist Ardoyne area in Belfast, July 13, 2013. More than 30 police officers were injured and 11 people arrested during overnight violence around traditional Orange Day parades in Northern Ireland, authorities said on Saturday. Thousands of pro-British Protestants march every summer in the British province, a regular flashpoint for sectarian violence as Catholics, many of whom favour unification with Ireland, see the parades as a provocation. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Chris Kilpatrick & Claire Cromie

He's come face-to-face with murderers and gangsters in some of the world’s most dangerous places.

Ross Kemp has experienced what it’s like to be caught up in the middle of Northern Ireland’s most contentious and volatile Twelfth parade.

The former EastEnders actor turned investigative journalist is currently in Northern Ireland filming for the new series of his Sky1 show 'Extreme World'.

And he received first-hand insight into parading tensions when he joined bands as they paraded through north Belfast.

He walked with marchers towards Ardoyne, the scene of fierce sectarian clashes in recent years.

This year’s parade will be unprecedented following the ruling by the Parades Commission that Orangemen cannot walk along the stretch of road adjacent to the Ardoyne shops, where most of the trouble in the past has erupted.

An Orange Order source said no official approach had been made to the Order by the film makers, but they were aware of their intentions and happy to facilitate the documentary makers.

Earlier this year Kemp spent time in Derry, also for the forthcoming series of his show.

And on Wednesday evening he talked to protesters in Ardoyne.

Currently in production, the documentary maker has just returned from Mumbai and Calcutta where he investigated India's sex-trafficking industry.

Previous programmes in the series have seen him infiltrate Venezuela's lawless prisons to lift the lid on Chavez's controversial regime, and in the Congo Kemp exposed the militias responsible for an epidemic of sexual violence against women.

He said: “I'm incredibly proud of the films we make for Sky 1.

“We remain dedicated to giving a voice to those caught up in some of the most extreme situations throughout the world.”

The third series of Extreme World will be screened in November.

Meanwhile, members of the PSNI came under attack again on Sunday night as loyalists staged a third consecutive night of protests and public disorder.

Officers entered an alleyway in the Woodvale Road area of North Belfast to remove potential missiles when they were attacked with bricks and six petrol bombs.

Two plastic bullets were fired by police and one officer was injured.

Riot police were deployed at sectarian interfaces around Belfast in anticipation of disorder.

Ten people were charged with various public order offences following Friday and Saturday's violence in north and east Belfast.

Eight of those were remanded in custody, while one person pleaded guilty and another was released on court bail.

Four hundred extra police officers from Britain were deployed to Northern Ireland on Saturday.

More than 600 mutual aid officers from England, Scotland and Wales were already in the region supporting the PSNI operation as tensions surrounding the traditional Twelfth of July commemorations spiralled into disorder.

The Orange Order had originally called for protests against the determination of the Parades Commission adjudication body but, in the wake of Friday's violence, senior Orangemen called for protest action to be suspended.

 

Belfast Telegraph

Promoted Links

Today's news headlines, directly to your inbox every morning.

Promoted Links

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News