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Rodent droppings found in storage unit used by Teddy's Ice Cream

  

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Closure order: A storage unit used by Teddy’s Ice Cream in Dún Laoghaire Harbour was one of five premises hit by closure orders last month. Photo: 
Mark Condren

Closure order: A storage unit used by Teddy’s Ice Cream in Dún Laoghaire Harbour was one of five premises hit by closure orders last month. Photo: Mark Condren

Closure order: A storage unit used by Teddy’s Ice Cream in Dún Laoghaire Harbour was one of five premises hit by closure orders last month. Photo: Mark Condren

A storage unit used by Teddy's Ice Cream in Dún Laoghaire Harbour was one of five premises hit by closure orders last month after the discovery of rodent droppings.

The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) has released details of five such orders and two prohibition orders which were served on business in July for breaches of food-safety legislation.

The closure order only related to an enclosed food packaging and storage unit used by the well-known ice-cream vendor, which came after an inspection by a HSE officer on July 14.

In a report, the inspector said that evidence of rodent infestation and droppings was noted in the store area.

Food packaging and foodstuffs were stored in the area, leaving them exposed to contamination by rodents.

The area was described as "very poorly pest-proofed" with numerous holes, gaps and defects noted in the structure allowing potential access to rodents.

Disturbed rodent poison was scattered on the floor.

"A grave and immediate danger to foodstuffs exists in the storage unit because rodents can transmit harmful pathogens to foodstuffs and food packaging through their droppings and urine," the report states.

A spokesperson for Teddy's Ice Cream said that a storage unit for a "small concession at Dún Laoghaire's east pier" was served a closure notice last month.

"This does not impact any other stores. This concession has been closed since the middle of March, to adhere to the Covid-19 government recommendations," the statement said.

"Before its closure, the unit was not used to store food for service. The issues outlined are being dealt with and the unit will not be used in the future."

Another closure order last month related to a Londis in Cabra where an inspector found raw meat was being cut and packaged in an area where ready-to-eat food is stored.

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Another order, which has since been lifted, was served on all food sales at the AIM Cash & Carry in Clondalkin industrial estate in west Dublin.

Inspectors found there was evidence of "recent rat activity" in the rear store area.

"Photographic evidence taken at the time of inspection shows an open chocolate bar under shelving in the rear store and rat droppings on the floor beside this partially eaten product," the closure order states.

"There was evidence of packaging having been gnawed by rats and poison bait trays having been disturbed.

"The building is not adequately pest proofed. There were gaps and holes in the external wall of the premises and at the shutter door in the rear store."

Another premises ordered to close while issues were resolved was the Indian Prince in Portlaoise.

The reason cited by the HSE officer was the discovery of rodent droppings in areas where open packages of food are stored and prepared.

According to Dr Pamela Byrne, FSAI chief executive, recent inspections have identified a number of breaches of food legislation related to food safety and hygiene practices.

The FSAI has also identified some food businesses that were not registered or approved.

"A number of serious incidents have been identified where authorised officers found people operating out of food premises or vehicles where no adherence to basic food safety and hygiene practices where in place," she said.


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