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Sunday 18 February 2018

Rio ticket deal may have breached criminal law - ODCE chief

The Moran Report found that THG was rejected as an authorised ticket reseller (ATR) for the Olympic Council of Ireland ahead of the Rio Games because officials in Brazil suspected it planned to hold unauthorised hospitality events. The contract subsequently went to Pro10, which Judge Carroll Moran said was effectively a front for THG Photo: AFP/GETTY
The Moran Report found that THG was rejected as an authorised ticket reseller (ATR) for the Olympic Council of Ireland ahead of the Rio Games because officials in Brazil suspected it planned to hold unauthorised hospitality events. The contract subsequently went to Pro10, which Judge Carroll Moran said was effectively a front for THG Photo: AFP/GETTY
Kevin Doyle

Kevin Doyle

The Olympic ticketing arrangement involving THG and Pro10 may have breached criminal law, the Office of the Director of Corporate Enforcement said.

In a lengthy analysis of the Moran Report into the Rio ticket fiasco, the ODCE's director Ian Drennan says it may be the case that those operating the arrangement made a gain by deceiving the International Olympic Committee (IOC) or Rio organisers.

The Moran Report found that THG was rejected as an authorised ticket reseller (ATR) for the Olympic Council of Ireland ahead of the Rio Games because officials in Brazil suspected it planned to hold unauthorised hospitality events. The contract subsequently went to Pro10, which Judge Carroll Moran said was effectively a front for THG.

The Oireachtas Committee on Sport asked the ODCE to review the Moran Report with a view to investigating whether any corporate laws were broken.

In a submission, seen by the Irish Independent, Mr Drennan said the sections of the report dealing with THG and Pro10 are "the most serious aspects".

He suggests the committee may wish to consider the report in the context of the Criminal Justice (Theft and Fraud Offences) Act 2001, which deals with deception.

Mr Drennan wrote it is not within the ODCE's remit to investigate a criminal offence. He added it is not clear where such an offence might have occurred.

The ODCE also considered the annual €60,000 honorarium paid to former OCI president Pat Hickey.

Mr Dreenan noted that the payments, which started in 2010, were properly reflected in the OCI's financial statements and all relevant taxes were paid.

"There would not appear to be evidence suggesting a breach of company law," he said.

Irish Independent

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