Wednesday 13 November 2019

Revealed: How Nazis planned to invade Ireland - dossier goes under hammer today

A top secret dossier that has been uncovered revealing that the German high command were planning to take over Ireland if the Nazi's had successfully invaded Britain during WWII
A top secret dossier that has been uncovered revealing that the German high command were planning to take over Ireland if the Nazi's had successfully invaded Britain during WWII
A map identifying strategic sections of the River Shannon, north of Limerick.
Adolf Hitler. Photo: Getty Images
The scenic lake at Gougane Barra in Co Corkwas part of the dossier.
The top-secret dossier revealing German plans to invade Ireland.
Entitled ‘Militargeographische Angaben uber Irland’, it pinpoints a number of strategic cities and sites that would have been the focus of any invasion.
Once put into operation, the plan was to be named 'Operation Sealion'.
Tourist maps and postcards, gathered before the war, were used in the Nazi plans to identify military targets.
While Ireland remained neutral during the war, it was seen as a potentially important strategic location for the German military whose U boats were allowed into Irish waters.
Pictures of key locations such as dams, ports, cities, high ground and beaches which the german military believed would be important when they invaded Ireland were collected and numbered.

Mark Hilliard

A TOP secret plan for a Nazi invasion of Ireland complete with maps and photographs goes under the hammer today.

The dossier contains detailed information and photographs of the country, viewed by Hitler as a potential target.

Entitled 'Militargeographische Angaben uber Irland', it pinpoints a number of strategic cities and sites that would have been the focus of any invasion.

While Ireland remained neutral during the war, it was seen as a potentially important strategic location for the German military whose U boats were allowed into Irish waters.

The dossier goes up for sale today at an auction being held in Ludlow Race Course in Shropshire, England, and it is expected to fetch about £600 (€750).

Since the war, the document has been kept privately by a family and out of public sight. Once put into operation, the plan was to be named 'Operation Sealion' but was scrapped once it became clear that the German Luftwaffe could not better the British RAF.

It was abandoned by Hitler and his top generals in September 1940.

However, experts believe the documents contradict the Irish expectation that they were immune from possible invasion due to their accommodation of German boats.

Historical document expert Richard Westwood Brookes put it simply: "No one in the world was safe from the evil of Hitler."

Irish Independent

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