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Praise: 'Chernobyl' series is lauded for bringing horrors of disaster to new generation

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Important work: Ali Hewson, Ryan Tubridy and Adi Roche at the charity lunch.
photo: brian mcevoy

Important work: Ali Hewson, Ryan Tubridy and Adi Roche at the charity lunch. photo: brian mcevoy

Important work: Ali Hewson, Ryan Tubridy and Adi Roche at the charity lunch. photo: brian mcevoy

The award-winning series 'Chernobyl' brought the nuclear tragedy to an entirely new audience after 34 years, according to charity founder Adi Roche.

Ms Roche, who established the Chernobyl Children International charity, attended a star-studded ceremony in Ballsbridge, Dublin, along with Ali Hewson, the charity's director, to mark the 10th year of fundraising lunches.

They praised the HBO mini-series for placing the disaster firmly into the minds of everyone.

Ms Roche said the series was "telling, honourable and was done with dignity".

"It's told to a whole new audience - people that had no memory of 1986 because they weren't even born," she said.

"Radioactivity is there for the rest of time. The effects have moved on to the third generation of Chernobyl victims."

Ms Hewson said: "The most important thing is the message gets out there of the human cost from these kinds of accidents and how important it is that we don't have another accident like that again."

The coronavirus has led to the postponement of a medical trip the charity had planned would leave Ireland today. Ms Roche said there could be no "risk" taken with sending medics to "work with children who have very compromised immune systems".

Irish Independent