Wednesday 24 April 2019

The Floating Voter: I am embarrassed and angry by 'warped thinking' behind London letter bombs - Coveney

Speaking on Independent.ie's 'Floating Voter' podcast

Tánaiste Simon Coveney TD with politics editor Kevin Doyle, deputy editor Philip Ryan and reporter Laura Larkin on the Floating Voter podcast.
Photo: David Conachy
Tánaiste Simon Coveney TD with politics editor Kevin Doyle, deputy editor Philip Ryan and reporter Laura Larkin on the Floating Voter podcast. Photo: David Conachy
Philip Ryan

Philip Ryan

TANAISTE Simon Coveney has said he is angry and embarrassed by the “warped thinking” which saw two letter bombs sent to transport hubs in London.

The Tanaiste said the people who sent the packages, which had Dublin postmarks, should be “isolated and criticised”.

Gardai are investigating the possibility that the letters were sent to airports and a train stations in London by dissident republican group the New IRA.

Speaking exclusively to Independent.ie’s Floating Voter podcast, Mr Coveney said: “I think any decent thinking person needs to reject utterly the kind of warped thinking that results in somebody sending an explosive device or something that can catch fire in the post into anywhere.”

He said he reacted to yesterday's reports with a “combination of anger and embarrassment” and praised the work of both the gardai and the police.

“The perception in the UK of this will be one of bemusement as to why anyone would want to send even a small explosive device like this to London from Dublin. The fact that it could happen and come from Dublin is something I and many other people would be uncomfortable with,” he added.

The Tanaiste also revealed new details of the Government’s on-going Brexit negotiations.

He said the Government will “intensify” contingency plans for the Irish border if Westminster MPs votes for a no-deal Brexit in the House of Commons next week.

However, he said the solution for the border in a no-deal scenario will still “look like something similar to the backstop”.

“If there is some other way of doing this that prevents border infrastructure or other checks and controls and facilitates an all-Irish economy to function into the future well then we are up for looking at that,” he added.

Mr Coveney separately discussed his family’s fostering of children during his youth. He spoke about encountering on the streets of Cork as a seven year old when walking through the city with one of those children.

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