Tuesday 19 March 2019

'Popular' poster ban for elections 'will hamstring new candidates'

Louth Tidy Towns Together has requested all candidates not to erect posters for the May elections after the initiative proved successful in the presidential campaign. Stock Image
Louth Tidy Towns Together has requested all candidates not to erect posters for the May elections after the initiative proved successful in the presidential campaign. Stock Image
Laura Lynott

Laura Lynott

A Tidy Towns poster initiative could hamstring new hopefuls in the upcoming local and European elections, according to candidates.

Louth Tidy Towns Together has requested all candidates not to erect posters for the May elections after the initiative proved successful in the presidential campaign.

Chair of the group Larry Magnier said the posters move had proved popular with the public.

"It will be a positive scheme if everyone complies, but if they don't it will undermine the process," Mr Magnier said.

"This is taking place for environmental purposes, we believe this is a growing national movement."

Fine Gael councillor Dolores Minogue said: "If every candidate was to promise they wouldn't put up a poster, that's the fairest way, but what happens when a candidate breaks that commitment?

"I feel for a new candidate, I know how hard it is to get your name out there.

"I can't be last out of the trap, so I'll be watching what others do and making my decision then."

Fianna Fáil councillor Conor Keelan said the move was "erroneous" and he had no intention of signing up to any voluntary code.

"This will hamstring new candidates and will give preference to sitting councillors," he said.

Irish Independent

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