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NAGP say it was 'wrong' that they did not have access to GP contract

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Maitiú Ó Tuathail socialising with Leo Varadkar

Maitiú Ó Tuathail socialising with Leo Varadkar

Maitiú Ó Tuathail socialising with Leo Varadkar

Former President of the National Association of General Practitioners (NAGP) Dr Maitiu O Tuathail has broken his silence on controversy surrounding the confidential Irish Medical Organisation (IMO) contract he received from Tánaiste Leo Varadkar.

Former President of the National Association of General Practitioners (NAGP) Dr Maitiu O Tuathail has broken his silence on controversy surrounding the confidential Irish Medical Organisation (IMO) contract he received from Tánaiste Leo Varadkar.

In a joint statement with former NAGP chair Dr Andrew Jordan, Mr O Tuathail confirmed they received the contract from Mr Varadkar but insisted it was "wrong" that their union did not have access to the information in the first place.

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The opposition has accused Tanaiste Leo Varadkar of inappropriate actions over his sharing of ‘confidential’ documents (Julien Behal/PA)

The opposition has accused Tanaiste Leo Varadkar of inappropriate actions over his sharing of ‘confidential’ documents (Julien Behal/PA)

The opposition has accused Tanaiste Leo Varadkar of inappropriate actions over his sharing of ‘confidential’ documents (Julien Behal/PA)

In a statement, they said the NAGP was "involved in extensive consultations" with the Department of Health and the HSE on the programme for chronic disease management throughout 2018.

They said the NAGP had a full trade union negotiation licence at the time and had monthly meetings with the Department of Health and the HSE.

"Arising from these talks, which went on for two years, the association was aware of the main content of the proposed new contract being sought by the State," the statement said.

The doctors confirmed they received the new GP contract the Government agreed with the IMO from Mr Varadkar.

"This was seen as a continuation of the decision by the Government to consult with the NAGP and its GP members and keep them informed throughout," they said.

"We could not adopt a position on the programme for chronic disease management as a union, without full access to the details that it contained.”

"It was wrong for one group of GPs to have access to the details of a chronic disease management programme, and for another group of GPs not to have equal access to that information, given that the NAGP and its members were involved in its formation.

"The programme for chronic disease management was to be rolled out to all GPs, and therefore all GPs had a right to understand what the programme entailed, and what would be required of them," they added.

Mr Varadkar is expected to face sustained questioning in the Dáil.

Yesterday, he mounted a vigorous defence of his actions, but admitted he had not followed “best practice” in providing the report to the NAGP.

Online Editors


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