| 4.9°C Dublin

Government should consider building ‘signature stadium’ for a ‘serious’ bid to host World Cup, committee told

Close

Olivier Giroud celebrates with the World Cup trophy and his teammates following his side's victory in the 2018 FIFA World Cup Final between France and Croatia at Luzhniki Stadium on July 15, 2018 in Moscow, Russia. (Photo by Matthias Hangst/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***

Olivier Giroud celebrates with the World Cup trophy and his teammates following his side's victory in the 2018 FIFA World Cup Final between France and Croatia at Luzhniki Stadium on July 15, 2018 in Moscow, Russia. (Photo by Matthias Hangst/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***

Olivier Giroud celebrates with the World Cup trophy and his teammates following his side's victory in the 2018 FIFA World Cup Final between France and Croatia at Luzhniki Stadium on July 15, 2018 in Moscow, Russia. (Photo by Matthias Hangst/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***

The Government should consider building a “signature stadium” to land a “serious” pitch in its bid to host the World Cup in 2030.

The Government is set to spend up to €500,000 on the bid by summer of next year, which is part of a joint effort to host the massive tournament along with the United Kingdom.

Fianna Fáil Senator Shane Cassells said that if Ireland is “serious” about hosting the World Cup then consideration should be given to building a “signature stadium” given that Croke Park will be 35 years old, he told Minister of State at the Department of Sport and Government chief Whip Jack Chambers at today’s meeting of the Oireachtas Culture and Arts committee

“We’ve been down this road before in terms of our failed bid for the Scots, for the UEFA championships for the rugby World Cup.

“In 2030, the Aviva’s going to be 20 years old, Croke Park is going to be 35 years old, and also the public infrastructure that is going to be required for us to make a serious bid - what’s stage are we at at the assessment of needs?”

“Do we need a new signature stadium to actually swing this from an Irish point of view as part of the bid?” he asked.

Minister Chambers said that any stadia and other public infrastructure required as part of the bid will be assessed.

“The bidding process is ongoing and any infrastructure assessment will be a part of it,” said Mr Chambers.

“There will be an assessment of the required stadia in Ireland.”

He added that the bid is still “at an early stage.”

Daily Digest Newsletter

Get ahead of the day with the morning headlines at 7.30am and Fionnán Sheahan's exclusive take on the day's news every afternoon, with our free daily newsletter.

This field is required

However, by next summer, around €500,000 will be spent on the bid by next summer.

“The World Cup, we expect to spend over €2m over a four year period and we’ve spent a very limited amount so far, could be up to about half a million by the summer of next year,” said Minister Chambers.


Most Watched





Privacy