Sunday 25 August 2019

One in two people wouldn't want other people to know they were experiencing mental health issues

January is commonly seen as a 'bleak period'

Artist Emma Sheridan, Helen McEntee, Minister of State for Mental Health and Older People, and First Fortnight co-founder David Keegan.
Artist Emma Sheridan, Helen McEntee, Minister of State for Mental Health and Older People, and First Fortnight co-founder David Keegan.
Catherine Devine

Catherine Devine

Almost one in two people wouldn't want others knowing they have mental health issues according to a new survey by First Fortnight.

The figures reveal that 49pc of people fear they will experience mental health problems in the future while 25pc said they wouldn't seek treatment for fear others would find out.

First Fortnight released the figures as January is commonly seen as a "bleak period", when many people are more vulnerable to experiencing poor mental health and depression in the period after Christmas.

The survey also found that only 10pc had not experienced mental health issues themselves or through a close family member or partner.

Some also expressed hesitation about living nearby or working with someone with a mental health issue.

First Fortnight co-founder JP Swaine said: “The reality is that some people are already doing living or working with people with mental health problems, but have no knowledge of it and it has had absolutely no impact on their lives.”

The survey of 1,366 attendees was carried out at the First Fortnight festival in January this year. The festival, which aims to remove the stigma around mental health, returns on New Year’s Day and runs for two weeks in Dublin and selected venues nationwide.

Online Editors

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News