Monday 22 January 2018

Nuns' order 'will have no active role' in new hospital

Kieran Mulvey, former chairman of the Workplace Relations Commission, acted as a mediator Photo: Tony Gavin
Kieran Mulvey, former chairman of the Workplace Relations Commission, acted as a mediator Photo: Tony Gavin
Eilish O'Regan

Eilish O'Regan

The Sisters of Charity owns the land on which the new national maternity hospital will be built in Dublin - but will have no real active role in its governance, it emerged yesterday.

Kieran Mulvey, the former chairman of the Workplace Relations Commission, acted as a mediator to end an impasse over the hospital's future between Holles Street and St Vincent's.

The fact that the religious order will own the new hospital has upset members of the Magdalene Survivors Together.

The order of nuns is among the religious congregations who owe money to the institutional abuse redress scheme.

Read More: Over 20,000 people sign petition seeking to prevent Sisters of Charity owning new maternity hospital

Mr Mulvey said his terms of reference were to deal with the relocation of Holles Street and to put in appropriate arrangements for all concerned.

He empathised with the victims but it is imperative that Holles Street would move as quickly as possible to St Vincent's campus.

He said the order will have no real active role in hospital governance.

Issues of redress should be addressed in the established forum, he told the 'Today with Sean O'Rourke' show on RTÉ radio. The issue around the National Maternity Hospital was a separate clinical need for the women of Ireland, that should be allowed to go ahead untarnished.

Separately, he pointed out that the sisters of charity is also involved in Oasis project in Dublin's North Inner City and it receives little or no funding for this, despite treating 8,000 clients last year.

Irish Independent

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