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No extra security measures as 'Charlie Hebdo' to hit Irish shelves

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Members of the Public during a vigil march in Dublin's city centre for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo on Sunday.
Photo:  Gareth Chaney Collins

Members of the Public during a vigil march in Dublin's city centre for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo on Sunday. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

Collins Dublin, Gareth Chaney

Members of the Public during a vigil march in Dublin's city centre for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo on Sunday. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

No extra security measures will be put in place by magazine distributors who will deliver copies of satirical French magazine 'Charlie Hebdo' to Irish newsagents this week.

The publication will be parcelled and delivered in the usual manner, distributors told the Irish Independent.

About three million copies of the magazine are to be sold around the world following the massacre of 17 people in France last week, including the 'Charlie Hebdo' editor and several contributors.

The series of attacks are believed to have been sparked by the magazine's cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammed.

Eason have not confirmed that they will stock the magazine but said they are currently looking at distribution options.

Chairman of the Irish Council of Imams, Sheikh Hussein Halawa said: "While we respect the right for freedom of expression, we nevertheless believe that other people's beliefs and values should also be respected, a value which is protected by Irish law.

"As an integrated part of Irish society, we would like to state that we highly respect Irish values and we appeal to all the people of Ireland to stand for protection and respect for all religious values and the concept of pluralism. We do not accept violence as a way to deal with issues and at the same time we do not accept offences."

This issue's cover appears to show the Prophet Mohammed holding a sign reading 'Je suis Charlie', which translates as 'I am Charlie', a phrase which has become synonymous with ideals of press freedom and unity. The headline reads 'Tout est pardonne' or 'All is forgiven'.

A spokeswoman from Spar said some individual stores may also carry the magazine.

Irish Independent