Monday 17 June 2019

WATCH: Incredible projects to see at BT Young Scientist and Technology Exhibition

Students Byron McGuirk & Luke Kelly from Portlaoise College Laois with exhibit Does Heading the ball in football affect your memory & reaction speed during The BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition at the RDS, Dublin
Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Students Byron McGuirk & Luke Kelly from Portlaoise College Laois with exhibit Does Heading the ball in football affect your memory & reaction speed during The BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition at the RDS, Dublin Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Stephanie French with exhibit something to chew on during The BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition at the RDS, Dublin Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Andrea Whyte from Athlone community college west Meath with exhibit Knock knock who is there? during The BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition at the RDS, Dublin Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Ryan Nugent

Ryan Nugent

SOME of the best scientific minds in the country have managed to create a system for hearing impaired people to know there’s a fire in their house among hundreds of projects on show at the RDS.

Kishoge Community College pair, Liyana Muhammed and Jordan Ahern’s project was one of 550 projects in total for the annual BT Young Scientist and Technology Exhibition.

Their system – which involves the use of a vibrating watch – came about after Liyana (16) had previously gone to school next to a deaf village in Cabra.

Two separate smoke detectors go through a low-power computer in the ceiling of the home.

“That has radio, so if they detect smoke, that will send a signal to the watch that the hearing impaired person will wear,” Jordan said.

“They can find out what room it’s in and get out as quick as possible to keep themselves safe,” he added.

In his speech to open the ceremony, President Michael D Higgins praised the high number of projects on show that dealt with global warming, climate change and pollution.

More than 80 of the 500 looked at this issue, including the Food for Fuels: Air Pollution project by three students from Coláiste Iognáid SJ in Galway City.

Such was their appetite to make their work a success, they even went out on Christmas Day to measure the air pollution in the area.

Among their findings by Eoin O’Máille, Maddie Mitchell and Róisín McGrath was that wood added to coal fires significantly increased pollution.

They said such was the pollution coming from open fires on Christmas Day that it gazumped pollution levels in Beijing.

In his speech, President Higgins also pointed out the need for more women in science, highlighting that more girls than boys entered into the BT Young Scientist for the 12th year in succession.

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