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Thunderstorms are on the way today, so enjoy the sizzling sunshine while you can

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Enjoying the sun yesterday by the Martello Tower at Seapoint, Co Dublin. Picture by Steve Humphreys

Enjoying the sun yesterday by the Martello Tower at Seapoint, Co Dublin. Picture by Steve Humphreys

Morriscastle Beach, Kilmuckridge, Co.Wexford, yesterday. Picture by Padraig O'Reilly

Morriscastle Beach, Kilmuckridge, Co.Wexford, yesterday. Picture by Padraig O'Reilly

Skye the dog cooling down at Seapoint, Co Dublin, yesterday. Picture by Steve Humphreys

Skye the dog cooling down at Seapoint, Co Dublin, yesterday. Picture by Steve Humphreys

Athletes compete in the bike section of the Ironman 70.3 challenge in Cork yesterday. Picture by Nigel Roddis

Athletes compete in the bike section of the Ironman 70.3 challenge in Cork yesterday. Picture by Nigel Roddis

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Enjoying the sun yesterday by the Martello Tower at Seapoint, Co Dublin. Picture by Steve Humphreys

Pack your sunscreen, but grab an umbrella too — as Ireland’s record hot spell may take a dramatic turn for the worse today in many parts of the country.

Ireland may have smashed previous August records last Friday and yesterday — but sun worshippers will now have to contend with a nationwide yellow thunderstorm warning that is in effect from 3pm today until 3am tomorrow.

Speaking to the Sunday Independent, Andrew Doran-Sherlock, meteorologist with Met Éireann, said parts of Ireland have broken new records in the past 48 hours.

“We have provisionally broken our all-time August record. Previously it was 31.5C in Oak Park in Carlow in 1995 and in the same location it got up to 31.7C on Friday. Provisionally that’s a record. It needs to be analysed, but it’s more than likely the case.”

He predicted said the good weather will continue today for a few more hours, with maximum temperatures of 27C to 30C — but then there will be a “big change”.

“This morning and afternoon will still be hot — especially over Leinster and Munster, where we’ve been seeing the highest temperatures all along —but then there will be a change,” he said.

“It has been exceptionally dry for the past week and we are now issuing a yellow thunderstorm warning for the entire country, which will last until 3am on Monday morning. It will be a big change for people.

“Because of the nature of thunderstorms they are quite localised weather events, so some places will stay dry.”

However he warned: “In the areas where we do see storms they will be quite heavy and slow moving, so we could see quite large accumulations in localised areas — which means there is also a risk of flooding and even hail. It will certainly be a change from the weather we’ve had over the last few days.”

Early this week, he said, Ireland will continue to experience “more unsettled conditions” and temperatures will “decline towards normal temperatures” for this time of year. These will range from 15C in the north to 20C in the south.

“They are not bad temperatures, but there will be a drop,” he said.

However, the meteorologist also said the warm weather was again a possibility later in the month.

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