Wednesday 12 December 2018

Status yellow rainfall warning issued as Storm Helene gets closer to Ireland's coastline

  • Met Eireann issue status yellow rainfall warning
  • Remnants of ex-tropical storm expected to pass over Ireland
Photo: Damien Eagers / INM
Photo: Damien Eagers / INM

Rachel Farrell

Met Éireann has warned of "high intensity" rainfall on Monday as Storm Helene crosses Ireland's path.

The national forecaster has issued a status yellow rainfall warning that is due to come into force at midday tomorrow.

Galway and Mayo are the counties affected, and have been warned of a risk of flooding, as up to 40mm of rainfall is expected.

The remnants of the ex-tropical storm are expected to pass over Ireland on Monday night, bringing with it lots of rain overnight and strong winds.

This enhanced satellite image made available by NOAA shows Tropical Storm Florence, upper left, in the Atlantic Ocean on Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2018 at 3:30 p.m. EDT. At center is Tropical Storm Isaac and at right is Hurricane Helene. (NOAA via AP)
This enhanced satellite image made available by NOAA shows Tropical Storm Florence, upper left, in the Atlantic Ocean on Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2018 at 3:30 p.m. EDT. At center is Tropical Storm Isaac and at right is Hurricane Helene. (NOAA via AP)

Met Éireann added that it “is possible” that yellow warning criteria may apply to counties Cork, Waterford, Wexford, Wicklow, Dublin, Meath and Louth as time goes on.

"On Monday night the remnants of tropical storm Helene will pass over the country. This is expected to bring high intensity rainfall over a short timeframe," a spokesperson for Met Éireann said this morning.

"Winds associated with the storm are currently expected to be strongest at sea and along the south and southeast coasts, with winds overland expected to be moderate to fresh, easterly in direction at first, then becoming cyclonic variable as the eye of the storm passes over."

Latest reports show that the storm, which will weaken to ex-tropical status this afternoon, is currently located to the north of the Azores at approximately 43°N and 28°W. It will continue to track northeastwards towards Ireland through the rest of today and Monday.

It is likely that Monday will see the worst of the storm remnants, with rain expected to spread eastwards quickly across the country and will be heavy in many areas for a time with a risk of spot flooding.

Tuesday will start off windy with temperatures between 16 and 20 degrees. It will be mostly dry throughout the day, but the rain is set to return on Tuesday night.

"Tuesday night will be wet again with another spell of rain approaching with lowest temperatures 9 or 10 degrees," the national forecasters said.

Heavy rain is expected on Wednesday, but conditions are set to pick up by Thursday afternoon as the last of the storm passes over.

"Wednesday is currently looking like being a wet day with heavy rain and strong southwest winds. The winds will back southerly during the day.

"Thursday is currently looking like the better of the days with rain clearing to showers and winds easing light southwest to west for a time. They will increase again later."

Met Eireann said that they will continue to "monitor the situation" today.

"Short interval intense rainfall may occur in places, but due to the speed at which the system is moving through, it is not envisaged at this stage that a rain warning will be required, although this aspect will continue to be examined more closely once our high resolution model guidance becomes available on Sunday.

"Met Éireann forecasters will continue to monitor the situation and issue warnings, as required, closer to the time."

Meanwhile in the US, the death toll from Storm Florence has risen to 11 after catastrophic flooding hit North Carolina. At least 29 have been killed from Typhoon Mangkhut in the Philippines.

 

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