Friday 19 July 2019

'She sure left a mark behind' - family and friends pay respects to Philomena Lynott ahead of funeral

Philomena 10 years ago at the opening of the Phil Lynott 60th birthday tribute. Photo: Arthur Carron/Collins
Philomena 10 years ago at the opening of the Phil Lynott 60th birthday tribute. Photo: Arthur Carron/Collins
Graham Lynott at the removal of his aunt Philomena Lynott in Portmarnock Pic: Mark Condren
Mourners at the removal of Philomena Lynott in Portmarnock Pic: Mark Condren
Flowers were left at the Phil Lynott statue by fans after his mother Philomena passed away
Sorcha O'Connor

Sorcha O'Connor

FRIENDS and family of Philomena Lynott, the mother of Thin Lizzy front-man Phil Lynott gathered today in Staffords Funeral Home in Portmarnock, Co Dublin to pay their respects to the 88-year-old.

She passed away on Wednesday after a battle with cancer.

Graham Lynott at the removal of his aunt Philomena Lynott in Portmarnock
Pic: Mark Condren
Graham Lynott at the removal of his aunt Philomena Lynott in Portmarnock Pic: Mark Condren

Nephew Graham Lynott, who lived with his aunt in Sutton said her death marked “the end of an era”. 

He told Independent.ie that he was sure there would be a “full-house” tomorrow at her funeral service at St Fintan’s Church in Sutton at noon. 

He said that he was sorry she would miss seeing a coin minted in Philip’s honour later this year. 

“It’s an end of an era, she was a very well-known celebrity in latter years more in her own right, and in keeping Philip’s light alive. All the things she achieved, the statue, the stamp and she will miss out in late August or September, the Central Bank has been on and there is a coin due to be released for Phil late August,” he said.

“All these little tributes, they were over-whelming to her and she was very grateful to one and all. She will be a tough one to replace, if at all, but she sure left a mark behind.”

Meanwhile, a long-time friend of Mrs Lynott and musician Jimmy Coup told of her “generous spirit” and how she had penned a reference for him when he was emigrating to Ireland from America. 

Mourners at the removal of Philomena Lynott in Portmarnock
Pic: Mark Condren
Mourners at the removal of Philomena Lynott in Portmarnock Pic: Mark Condren

“We all knew her as Ma. She wrote the letter that got me through emigration here: ‘Jimmy has been like a son to me,’ she said. The people that know her or knew her all had a special relationship with her and she made each one of us feel like we were the only one at whatever moment was going on. That is a special buzz and Philip had that too - but she had it first.” 

“She really showed us how to grow old, she made an example for all of us on how to grow old,” he added. 

He first met Mrs Lynott when he visited Phil’s grave, in Ireland to attend the Vibe for Philo festival which commemorates Phil Lynott’s musical legacy every year.

“I met her at the grave. I met her on the 3rd of January, I got off the plane coming to The Vibe and went to the grave. It was a freezing cold morning. There was an old lady and she was shuffling because it was icy. She was alone and I said to myself, ‘Do you think that might be...?’ 

“I went up to her and asked if she was Mrs Lynott. And we both burst into tears so we went to the grave and it is the same story many people have, she invited me to the house for tea and the rest is history.” 

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