Tuesday 23 October 2018

Seven teens rescued after getting into difficulty on Dublin beach

Irish Coast Rescue 116 helicopter and Dun Laoghaire RNLI's volunteer lifeboat crew deployed

An RNLI inshore crew pictured as they guide a group of 6 people away from the sand spit off Sandymount, after they became trapped by the incoming tide. Picture: Frank Mc Grath
24/3/18
An RNLI inshore crew pictured as they guide a group of 6 people away from the sand spit off Sandymount, after they became trapped by the incoming tide. Picture: Frank Mc Grath 24/3/18
A group of people wait for an RNLI Inshore RIB to Rescue them from a sand spit off Sandymount, after they became trapped by the incoming tide. Picture: Frank Mc Grath 24/3/18
The Dun Laoghaire RNLI lifeboat. Stock image

Sasha Brady

A group of teenagers had to be rescued by Dun Laoghaire RNLI's volunteer lifeboat crew after they got into difficulty when walking on Sandymount Strand this afternoon.

The alarm was raised shortly after 2pm today when one of the teenagers called the Irish Coast Guard.

The Irish Coast Rescue 116 helicopter from Dublin was tasked alongside the Dun Laoghaire RNLI crew.

The volunteer crew, helmed by Mark McGibney with crew member Adam O'Sullivan, launched their inshore lifeboat in four minutes. They made their way to the scene, some four nautical miles from the station.

A group of people wait for an RNLI Inshore RIB to Rescue them from a sand spit off Sandymount, after they became trapped by the incoming tide. Picture: Frank Mc Grath
24/3/18
A group of people wait for an RNLI Inshore RIB to Rescue them from a sand spit off Sandymount, after they became trapped by the incoming tide. Picture: Frank Mc Grath 24/3/18

They came across the group of seven teenagers, who they described as "dry, safe and well". They had become stuck on a sandbank surrounded by water when caught out by an incoming tide.

The lifeboat crew walked the lifeboat into the shallow area and transferred the teenagers to the boat, while the helicopter hovered over.

The lifeboat was then brought into deeper water before the engine was started and it made its way back to the lifeboat station escorted by the helicopter overhead.

Speaking following the call out, Dun Laoghaire Helm Mark McGibney praised the teens for raising the alarm.

"We would like to commend the group for raising the alarm when they got into trouble, that was the right thing to do," he said.

"As the weather picks up and as we begin the Easter holidays, we would remind everyone to enjoy themselves but to always respect the water.

"Check the weather conditions and tide times before planning your activity and if you do get into difficulty dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard.

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