Saturday 25 January 2020

Scottish ex-pats living here want to keep union

Scottish man John Gibson, living in Ballinteer, who says he'd vote no in the Sottish referendum on Independence. Picture:Arthur Carron
Scottish man John Gibson, living in Ballinteer, who says he'd vote no in the Sottish referendum on Independence. Picture:Arthur Carron

SCOTTISH people living here say the economic uncertainty of independence may sway voters to reject the referendum.

Mother-of-four Hazel Convery, originally from Glasgow but now living in Clonskeagh in Dublin, moved to Ireland in 1967 and says she thinks most ex-pats would prefer to remain part of Britain.

"The older folk it seems are more inclined to vote 'no' than 'yes'," she told the Irish Independent.

"I've read about the financial consequences. There is just so much involved and I'm not convinced that Scotland can survive as an independent country any more comfortably than it does at the moment."

The referendum campaign has frequently drawn comparisons with Ireland's battle for independence, but Hazel says the two should not be viewed in the same light.

"I don't know what percentage of the Scottish population are quite happy with the situation at the moment but a much greater proportion of the population of Ireland would have been unhappy with the situation. There's the religious connotations as well which I don't think exists this time."

Another Scot in Dublin, Ballinteer-based John Gibson (inset), said he would vote 'no' if he was still living in Scotland.

"I'd be for staying in the union and I think among my main concerns is the financial and economic impact. I suspect that if it is a 'yes' vote there could be quite a bit of disruption to the financial services sector.

He added: "It's not to say it definitely wouldn't work but there wouldn't be this utopia that gets painted. There will be difficult times if it passes."

Irish Independent

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