Wednesday 20 June 2018

Molly Martens spent $5,500 on industrial clean of blood stains, preventing forensic tests

  • Molly ordered cleaning of luxury home within hours of her release from custody
  • Earlier tests conducted at property proved central to conviction
  • Martens revealed psychiatric history to Jason Corbett weeks before their wedding
  • New book details the breakdown in the relationship between Corbett and Martens
August 9, 2017. Molly Martens Corbett (33) and her father, retired FBI agent Thomas Martens (67), are convicted in North Carolina of the second degree murder of Irishman Jason Corbett (39) in 2015. Both are now serving sentences of between 20 and 25 years in prison. Mr Corbett died from horrific head injuries sustained during a prolonged assault at the luxury home he shared with his wife, Molly. Pictured is an image that was released during the trial of Molly Martens on the night of the murder.
August 9, 2017. Molly Martens Corbett (33) and her father, retired FBI agent Thomas Martens (67), are convicted in North Carolina of the second degree murder of Irishman Jason Corbett (39) in 2015. Both are now serving sentences of between 20 and 25 years in prison. Mr Corbett died from horrific head injuries sustained during a prolonged assault at the luxury home he shared with his wife, Molly. Pictured is an image that was released during the trial of Molly Martens on the night of the murder.
Ralph Riegel

Ralph Riegel

Molly Martens spent $5,500 (€4,670) on an industrial clean of her blood-soaked North Carolina home just hours after being released from police custody following the bludgeoning to death of her Irish husband Jason Corbett.

The cleaning of her luxury Panther Creek Court home, which she ordered within hours of her release from custody, effectively prevented further forensic tests by US police.

However, the critical tests and recordings already conducted at the property on August 2, 2015, proved central to the conviction last year of Martens (34) and her father, retired FBI agent Tom Martens (67), for the second degree murder of Mr Corbett. Both are now serving sentences of between 20 and 25 years.

The revelations came in a new book written by Mr Corbett’s sister, Tracey Corbett-Lynch, which detailed for the first time the shocking lengths Martens was prepared to go to to obtain custody of her husband’s two children by his first wife.

Jason Corbett
Jason Corbett

‘My Brother Jason’ is published by Gill Books and all proceeds from it will go to Mr Corbett’s children by his first wife, Margaret ‘Mags’ Fitzpatrick (30), who died of a tragic asthma attack in 2006.

Mr Corbett met Tennessee-born Martens when she travelled to Ireland to work as a nanny for the children of the Limerick widower.

He was unaware that she had been released from a psychiatric clinic in Georgia just weeks earlier in 2008.

Martens revealed her psychiatric history to Mr Corbett only weeks before their planned wedding in June 2011.

The book says that Martens went to a divorce lawyer in the US just weeks after she married Mr Corbett, and wanted to know what her custody rights were to the children, Jack and Sarah.

Within weeks of the family setting up home in North Carolina, following relocation from Mr Corbett’s native Limerick, Martens was telling neighbours that Sarah was her biological daughter.

Neighbours later admitted shock at the realisation Martens was not the girl’s natural mother  – having listened to her lengthy description of how difficult her labour had been.

She also claimed that she was a good friend of Mr Corbett’s late first wife, despite the fact they had never met or been in correspondence.

Martens told some people Mags had asked her to look after her children if anything happened to her.

Ms Corbett-Lynch revealed her brother was battered to death with a metal baseball bat and a heavy concrete brick in his sleep just hours before he planned to fly his children back to Ireland.

Tracey Lynch Picture: Mark Condren
Tracey Lynch Picture: Mark Condren

He had also been drugged with a sedative prescribed to his wife just days earlier.

Martens suffered from a long history of mental health problems and the strain on their marriage had been increasing in the months before Mr Corbett’s murder as her behaviour became increasingly bizarre.

Ms Corbett-Lynch said she believed her brother’s killing was premeditated because

he was planning to take his

children to the safety of Ireland and away from Martens’s influence.

When the Limerick woman flew to North Carolina to fight for custody of Jack and Sarah after their father’s murder in August 2015, the entire Irish family were initially prevented from having access to Mr Corbett’s body.

Only swift thinking from the North Carolina Police and medical personnel had frustrated efforts by Martens to have Mr Corbett’s body cremated before his family could arrive.

Martens then only consented to allow them access to the body when the Irish family gave a written, legal undertaking to foot all the costs of his funeral and the repatriation of his body to Ireland.

She arranged a special memorial service for him in North Carolina – and hired off-duty police officers from outside the county to ensure no members of Mr Corbett’s Irish family were able to gain admittance.

The book detailed, through emails and private correspondence, the deeply troubled personal history of Martens and how she waged a determined psychological campaign to get her husband to prove his love for her by moving from Ireland to the US.

The young woman fabricated stories and achievements, waged psychological warfare against people she disliked or considered to be rivals, and obsessed for years about securing sole control of her husband’s two children.

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