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Mica controversy: ‘We were told it was best to say nothing’

Public buildings in Donegal, including a school, are displaying signs of mica damage

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Michael Doherty outside the Donegal County Council offices in Carndonagh, Co Donegal. Picture by Joe Dunne

Michael Doherty outside the Donegal County Council offices in Carndonagh, Co Donegal. Picture by Joe Dunne

The library in Carndonagh, Co Donegal. Picture by Joe Dunne

The library in Carndonagh, Co Donegal. Picture by Joe Dunne

Craigtown National School in Tullanree, Carndonagh, Co Donegal. Picture by Joe Dunne

Craigtown National School in Tullanree, Carndonagh, Co Donegal. Picture by Joe Dunne

Craigtown National School in Tullanree, Carndonagh, Co Donegal. Picture by Joe Dunne

Craigtown National School in Tullanree, Carndonagh, Co Donegal. Picture by Joe Dunne

Cracks in the library building

Cracks in the library building

The Donegal County Council offices in Carndonagh

The Donegal County Council offices in Carndonagh

The Donegal County Council offices in Carndonagh

The Donegal County Council offices in Carndonagh

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Michael Doherty outside the Donegal County Council offices in Carndonagh, Co Donegal. Picture by Joe Dunne

It is a scandal that has turned homes and dreams to dust in Co Donegal, but there are fears that the mica controversy may run much deeper than that.

There are now concerns that several public buildings in the county — including a school, a hospital, a council office and a public library — are showing visible evidence of significant damage similar to that caused by mica.


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