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It's another hat-trick for the squeaky-clean Cats

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Conor Horgan from Irish Business Against Litter with Kilkenny Representitves who were Winners of the IBAL Ireland'Äôs cleanest town 2014 Pat Millea Cathaoirleach of Kilkenny County Council & Brian Tyrrell Senior Executive Officer Kilkeny County Council

Conor Horgan from Irish Business Against Litter with Kilkenny Representitves who were Winners of the IBAL Ireland'Äôs cleanest town 2014 Pat Millea Cathaoirleach of Kilkenny County Council & Brian Tyrrell Senior Executive Officer Kilkeny County Council

Collins Dublin, Gareth Chaney

Conor Horgan from Irish Business Against Litter with Kilkenny Representitves who were Winners of the IBAL Ireland'Äôs cleanest town 2014 Pat Millea Cathaoirleach of Kilkenny County Council & Brian Tyrrell Senior Executive Officer Kilkeny County Council

Kilkenny made it three in a row when it again topped the ranking of Ireland's cleanest towns and cities, pipping Cavan.

Cavan, a previous winner, came in second place in the ranking of 40 towns and cities compiled by the Irish Business Against Litter Association. Longford and Tramore, Co Waterford, finished in joint third position.

But Kilkenny's 'luck' was no accident, said the Cathaoirleach of Kilkenny County council, Pat Millea. "There's been a lot of hard work by staff," he said. The people of Kilkenny "no longer litter", he added. "There's a civic pride there. They don't litter. They use bins."

Meanwhile, Dublin City Council officials have revealed how they are going to ramp up the campaign to get the capital's north inner city cleaner. The latest IBAL survey put the area second from bottom - though it is 30pc cleaner than it was earlier this year.

An 'Adopt a Street' scheme will be unveiled in spring, with local people given the equipment needed to keep the street clean. Bernie Lillis of the council said food waste - such as chewing gum and fast food leftovers - were the main littering problems in the city centre. "If you're near a school, you just follow the trail of food to find the shop," she said.

The council is spending €350,000 a year on cleaning up chewing gum, she said.

Brian Hanney, from Dublin City Council's Waste Management Division, said the main problem in the inner city area was black sacks of household refuse.

The council has begun targeting landlords to ensure that a proper waste disposal system is in place for tenants and that homes with space for bins take them.

"Black bags are a disaster," said John McPartlan, public domain officer in the central area of the city.

He added that they were often torn apart by dogs and seagulls hunting for food.

Irish Independent