Thursday 19 April 2018

Green light for 500 homes in north Dublin despite more than 1,000 local objections

St Paul’s College, Raheny, where the club currently play their games
St Paul’s College, Raheny, where the club currently play their games
Paul Melia

Paul Melia

PLANNING permission for more than 500 homes beside St Anne’s Park in Dublin have been approved despite widespread local opposition.

An Bord Pleanála has given the green-light for 100 houses and more than 400 apartments on lands east of St Paul’s College on Sybil Hill Road in Raheny, despite more than 1,000 local objections.

The decision, which was made under a fast-track planning process, is subject to 24 conditions. At least 10pc of all homes will be for social housing.

The application was made by Crekav Trading and included 104 houses and 432 apartments on land formerly owned by the Vincentian Fathers, which are the trustees of St Paul’s College which had uses the land as playing pitches.

Some of the hundreds of concerned people who turned out to protest against development plans for St Anne's Park, Raheny
Some of the hundreds of concerned people who turned out to protest against development plans for St Anne's Park, Raheny

The developer proposed building new all-weather pitches to replace those currently on the site.

Some 1,102 submissions were made, most opposed to the plan, which centred on concerns around the impact on St Anne’s Park, traffic and Brent Geese which use the pitches as a feeding ground.

The board inspector said they were of the view that there was capacity on other sites to “absorb the loss” of the feeding grounds.

“I consider the principle of residential development to be acceptable on this site,” the inspector said, adding they “noted” the recommendation of Dublin City Council chief executive Owen Keegan to refuse permission amid concerns about the impact on geese, the amount of public open space to be provided and community facilities to be provided.

The council said it was not opposed to high density development on the lands, subject to concerns being addressed.

“I am of the opinion that this is a zoned, serviceable site within an established built-up, urban area where a wide range of services and facilities exist,” they added.

“The site forms part of a larger school complex, with the lands demonstrated to be surplus to their needs. The proposal will result in the loss of playing pitches to the school and the wider community. However, new community facilities are being provided, albeit of a different nature and the location of the site adjoining St Anne’s Park, with all the amenities and facilities it has on offer, is noted.”

The board agreed, adding the development would not detract from the setting of St Anne’s Park of the protected Sybil Hill House, and was “in accordance with the proper planning and sustainable development of the area”.

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