Monday 11 December 2017

Did you see the ‘fireball’ meteor last night? Because it could make you some cash

The meteor, so bright astronomers call it a ‘fireball’, was seen blazing across the sky at 5.15pm yesterday
The meteor, so bright astronomers call it a ‘fireball’, was seen blazing across the sky at 5.15pm yesterday
Daire Courtney

Daire Courtney

An extremely bright meteor was seen in the Irish skies yesterday evening – and the result could make you some money.

The meteor, so bright astronomers call it a ‘fireball’, was seen blazing across the sky at 5.15pm on Wednesday.

Astronomy Ireland have said they believe the fireball was “burning up high in the atmosphere as it collided with the Earth.”

Witnesses to the fireball said that it was brighter than the full moon; Astronomy Ireland say that this means the meteor may have survived the fall and hit the ground as a meteorite.

Meteorites can be sold for as much as 50 times the price of gold, so you may be in for a Christmas bonus if you can find where it landed.

Astronomy Ireland have asked anyone with CCTV cameras to check the footage from 5.15pm yesterday and submit it to astronomy.ie if it caught a glimpse of the meteor.

The organisation will announce the location in the coming days to allow everyone to search for the meteorite.

David Moore, Editor of Astronomy Ireland magazine said "We get at least one major fireball over Ireland each year. Many of them end up falling in the sea, but in 1999 all the reports we received allowed us to predict a meteorite had fallen on Carlow and sure enough some fragments of it were found on a country lane near Leighlinbridge, Co Carlow.

“Parts of this meteorite were being sold online by collectors for 50 times the price of gold so there is great excitement around the hunt for Irish meteorites! Rest assured that we will be doing a big story about the event and any subsequent search for Astronomy Ireland magazine as this is a major Irish story for our readers."

Anyone who wishes to join the search can submit an eyewitness or CCTV report or sign up at astronomy.ie for a chance to find the meteorite.

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