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Friday 22 June 2018

More than 1,000 reports of suspected child abuse have been reported to Tusla since December

(Stock picture)
(Stock picture)
Laura Larkin

Laura Larkin

More than 1,000 reports of suspected child abuse have been made by people working with children in the first six weeks of mandatory reporting.

Mandatory reporting came into effect on December 11 and sees professionals such as teachers, doctors, nurses and gardaí, mandated to report suspicions of child abuse to Tusla, the Child and Family Agency.

The move was met with mixed reaction at the time with many children’s groups welcoming the move.

However, Tusla raised concerns that the expected spike in reports would put impossible pressure on child protection services.

Children’s Minister Katherine Zappone pressed ahead with the implementation of mandatory reporting and structures were put in place to prepare Tusla for the new reporting requirement.

The first figures available from Tusla show that 1,100 reports have been made in the first six weeks of the new system.

“Even with the health warning that the figures are preliminary it is clear the anticipated spike has not happened,” Minister Zappone said today.

“Thankfully the negative impact on children’s services has also not materialised.”

Under the new law professionals such as teachers, doctors, nurses and gardaí, must report suspicions of child abuse to Tusla, the Child and Family Agency.

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