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Saturday 7 December 2019

Martin McGuinness: ‘Gerry shouldn’t have made b******s comment’

Northern Ireland Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness arrives for the memorial service of former Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) leader and First Minister Rev Ian Paisley at Ulster Hall, Belfast.
Northern Ireland Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness arrives for the memorial service of former Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) leader and First Minister Rev Ian Paisley at Ulster Hall, Belfast.
Brian O'Reilly

Brian O'Reilly

NORTHERN Ireland’s Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness has admitted Gerry Adams shouldn’t have made a comment referring to unionists as b******s.

However, he praised the Sinn Fein leader for withdrawing and apologising for his remarks.

Mr Adams spoke about "bigotry" in unionism and said: "The point is to break these b******s . . . break them with equality."

Gerry Adams ignites a war of words with unionists  

Queen Elizabth meets martin McGuinness in June.
Queen Elizabth meets martin McGuinness in June.

Speaking to Morning Ireland on Radio One this morning, Mr McGuinness said Mr Adam’s apology was in stark contrast to DUP politican Gregory Campbell, who has still not apologised over offensive remarks on the Irish language.

DUP politician who mocked Irish language receives 'serious threat to his life'

MP defends 'curry my yoghurt' jibe 

“Well Gerry shouldn’t have said it, and he did apologise.

Gregory Campbell
Gregory Campbell

“And I think that is in stark contrast to others who have made far more offensive remarks and haven’t apologised.”

He added that Mr Adams made the comment referring to homophobes, racists and sectarian bigots.

“That doesn’t excused to use of the word. Gerry shouldn’t have said it and he apologised for it.”

He said that Mr Campbell’s comments on the Irish language made him aware that many within the DUP still hate Irish culture.

“It tells me that we have an even bigger job to do to overcome these difficulties, but I’m a solution finder.

“We are dealing with a number of people on the DUP benches in the assembly who hate the Irish language, who hate anything Irish and are very backwards in their thinking.

“In a society emerging from conflict, what we all need to be involved in is a very genuine and sincere process of reconciliation. And I think I have made many personal effort in the course of recent times to reach out the hand of friendship to the Unionist community.

“And however they respond to us, the right thing to do is to continue with that work.”

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