Tuesday 16 October 2018

Man fined after dog who didn't receive treatment for cancer found 'unable to stand'

*Warning this story contains images some readers may find distressing

A dog was euthanised after being found in a poor state by an ISPCA inspector
A dog was euthanised after being found in a poor state by an ISPCA inspector
A dog was euthanised after being found in a poor state by an ISPCA inspector
A dog was euthanised after being found in a poor state by an ISPCA inspector
A dog was euthanised after being found in a poor state by an ISPCA inspector
A dog was euthanised after being found in a poor state by an ISPCA inspector
Laura Larkin

Laura Larkin

A Cavan farmer was fined under animal welfare legislation after a dog diagnosed with cancer but never treated was found "emaciated, dehydrated and unable to stand" according to the ISPCA.

The farmer was fined €200 and ordered to pay costs of €992.50 to the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine after pleading guilty to two offences under sections 11 and 12 of the Animal Health and Welfare Act 2013 at Virginia District Court.

The charges related to an elderly German Shepherd dog seized from Mr Maples’ property by ISPCA Inspector Elaine Reynolds on Saturday August 6 2016.

A concerned member of the public had contacted the charity with concerns.

"The dog was taken for immediate veterinary assessment and found to be emaciated, dehydrated and unable to stand. Growths, pressure sores and a large abscess were also found on the dog’s body. Due to his age and the severity of his condition, the dog was immediately euthanised on humane grounds," the ISPCA said in a statement.

Ms Reynolds described to the court how, in a cautioned interview, the farmer claimed that the dog had been diagnosed with cancer approximately 18 months previously but admitted that it had not been seen by a vet subsequently.

"It was so sad to see the state to which this dog had deteriorated. It is not acceptable to leave an animal to suffer on the basis that it is old. Elderly animals are more likely to require veterinary attention and failure to provide such essential care can have serious consequences as today’s case shows," Ms Reynolds said.

  • The ISPCA has asked members of the public to continue to report any animal welfare concerns by contacting the National Animal Cruelty Helpline on 1890 515 515 or report cruelty online on http://www.ispca.ie/cruelty_complaint.

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