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Justice Minister Shatter surprised about ‘Apple’ airport in the middle of Dundrum

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The airport, which does not exist, comes up in the maps application of the latest iPhone and iPad operating systems.

The airport, which does not exist, comes up in the maps application of the latest iPhone and iPad operating systems.

The blunder is one of a series discovered in the new iPhone update, which also suggests Dublin Zoo is located in Temple Bar.

The blunder is one of a series discovered in the new iPhone update, which also suggests Dublin Zoo is located in Temple Bar.

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The airport, which does not exist, comes up in the maps application of the latest iPhone and iPad operating systems.

MINISTER for Justice Alan Shatter has said he is surprised at the discovery of an airfield in the middle of Dundrum, his constituency.

The airport, which does not exist, comes up in the maps application of the latest iPhone and iPad operating systems and the Minister said he had made arrangements to inform Apple of the error.

The blunder is one of a series discovered in the new iPhone update, which also suggests Dublin Zoo is located in Temple Bar.

“I know on occasion mistakes can be made and I am surprised to discover that Airfield, which is in the centre of my constituency in Dundrum, has, in Apple’s new operating system iOS 6 maps application, been designated with the image of an aircraft,” Minister Shatter said in a statement.

"Clearly the designation is not only wrong but is dangerously misleading in that it could result in a pilot, unfamiliar with the area, in an emergency situation and without other available information, attempting a landing.

"I have arranged that Apple be informed of the error and requested that it be urgently corrected."

“There are a variety of possible alternative images that could be utilised such a cow, a goat, a sheep, a flower or any indeed other type of plant as Airfield operates a nursery.”

But Mr Shatter's warning did not wash with experienced pilots operating in busy Dublin airways.

Paul Cullen, director of safety and technical with the Irish Airline Pilots Association (IALPA), said he doubted pilots would be using phones for navigation.

"Well, I'd be surprised if pilots had their phones on," he said. "If you were flying a small two-seater there's no reason not to have a phone, but for commercial planes 'No'."

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Mr Cullen also doubted there was any need for concerns that recreational pilots would be preparing to land on the farm after spotting it on their phones.

"If it was a real emergency in a small aircraft, you would be looking for a landing strip and you wouldn't have time to take your phone out to look for an airport," he said.

He pointed out that commercial aircraft would only use industry-recognised navigational equipment.



"Small aircraft can use anything from a road atlas up, you wouldn't even necessarily be using a compass because you'd be flying visually," he said.



"They'd use a lot of physical features, rivers, train lines, you'd see it is not an airport."



Airfield Park is actually a 35-acre estate incorporating a city farm and gardens. It is currently closed for renovations.

The error prompted Dublin Airport Authority to tweet: "Just in case anybody is confused @DublinAirport is not moving to the southside. #mapfail."

The map marking was first spotted by Aleesha Tully and posted on her @aleeshajulia Twitter account.

It is understood Mr Shatter saw the reference to Airfield first hand, prompting his alert.

(Additional reporting Press Association)


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