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Jedward's mum in love with their Eurovision rival

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Engelbert Humperdinck is
still enjoying success as a
singer after 45 years.

Engelbert Humperdinck is still enjoying success as a singer after 45 years.

Engelbert Humperdinck is
still enjoying success as a
singer after 45 years.

Engelbert Humperdinck is still enjoying success as a singer after 45 years.

Engelbert in his halcyon
days.

Engelbert in his halcyon days.

the dynamic duo Jedward give their winning
performance in the national final

the dynamic duo Jedward give their winning performance in the national final

former
Eurovision winners Johnny Logan and Linda Martin

former Eurovision winners Johnny Logan and Linda Martin

/

Engelbert Humperdinck is still enjoying success as a singer after 45 years.

MOTHER of the hair-raising Jedward twins will face divided loyalties on the night of the Eurovision contest.

Susanna Grimes is a huge fan of golden oldie perma-tanned heartthrob Engelbert Humperdinck, who will represent Britain this year.

As such, he will be singing against his polar opposites -- the youthful, zesty Irish duo -- at this year's 57th Eurovision Song Contest in Azerbaijan in May.

The 20-year-old dynamos didn't know the first thing about the 75-year-old crooner best known for his 1967 hit 'Release Me' and had to 'google' him to find out what competition they were facing.

Nostalgic

But manager Louis Walsh revealed that their mother was a major fan.

"Their mother Susanna told me she is a massive Engelbert fan and loves 'The Last Waltz'.

"They (Jedward) don't know him but they know their mother likes him so they like him too," Mr Walsh told the Irish Independent last night.

But obviously her two bouncing boys will get their mother's vote.

Mr Humperdinck's choice as Britain's representative raised eyebrows yesterday and adds a nostalgic touch to the event that extends appeal beyond the normal realms of curiosity.

Mr Walsh said: "I think he is really brave to do it, he has had an amazing career.

"He has made hundreds of millions of records and I don't know why he'd do it. You wouldn't see Tom Jones doing it. I'm a big Engelbert fan."

The pop impresario predicted the crooner would get a "good vote" if he gets the right song. "He'll get an older vote and Jedward will get a young vote," he added.

Mr Walsh said he had already had success at Eurovision with two wins while managing Johnny Logan and one with singer Linda Martin.

Last night, Ms Martin, who is Jedward's mentor for the Eurovision, said Mr Humperdinck was such an unusual choice that he should do well for Britain.

"The age barrier doesn't mean too much, you are still going to have the mammies voting for him... He'll look dashing in a silver fox kind of way," she said.

She speculated that maybe Britain believed "going out on a limb" and picking an older singer with a past hit record was its path to success.

However, she said he had still got to beat Jedward's catchy tune 'Waterline'. "I would say that as soon as I heard it I loved it immediately," she said.

The twins -- John and Edward Grimes -- last year managed to boost Ireland's dwindling Eurovision success as they gained Ireland entry into the main Eurovision Song Contest final in Dusseldorf, where they finished eighth.

The Kildare brothers have already been voted to represent Ireland for the second year in a row at the competition.

Scores of Jedward's young fans gathered outside the RTE studios to cheer them on as they were successfully selected by public and regional jury votes as this year's Irish entry.

Mr Humperdinck is the oldest Eurovision contestant and the BBC may be hoping that using an established name will help reverse a slump in fortunes for British acts.

"It's an absolute honour to be representing my country for this year's Eurovision Song Contest," Mr Humperdinck, who was born in India and raised in Leicester, said yesterday.

Irish Independent