Wednesday 24 October 2018

ISPCA seek new homes for 44 cats surrendered from Meath property

The number of cats on the property grew from three to 44 in just three years

The ISPCA is appealing for new homes for the felines surrendered. PhotoL ISPCA
The ISPCA is appealing for new homes for the felines surrendered. PhotoL ISPCA

Kyle Ewald

A total of 44 cats and kittens were surrendered to the ISPCA today from a County Meath property.

The property was originally home to just three cats, but this multiplied drastically in only three years because none of the felines were spayed or neutered.

ISPCA Inspector Elaine Reynolds made the shocking discovery following a call made by a member of the public to the National Animal Cruelty Line.

The ISPCA said while the cats were found to be healthy, the numbers were increasing at such an unsustainable rate that more serious welfare issues were inevitable in the future. The number of cats in the one area also created a dangerous over-crowding situation. 

The property was originally home to just three cats, but this multiplied drastically in only three years because none of the felines were spayed or neutered. Photo: ISPCA
The property was originally home to just three cats, but this multiplied drastically in only three years because none of the felines were spayed or neutered. Photo: ISPCA

“This situation could have been prevented if the owner had neutered or spayed the three cats initially. We need pet owners to be responsible by spaying and neutering their cats or kittens as early as possible,” Inspector Reynolds advised.

“Our centres are consistently at capacity, and it is vital that pet owners help us tackle the issue of pet overpopulation. Neutering and spaying is the most effective way to prevent cat over-breeding and it will go a long way in preventing unwanted litters of kittens from being born in the first place.”

The ISPCA also warned of the health benefits of being spayed and neutered, warning that cats un-fixed cats are more likely to develop mammary cancer, uterus infections, and birthing difficulties.

Neutering also reduces fighting and unwanted territorial behaviour as well as reduces risk of FIV and Feline Leukaemia Viral Infection. 

The ISPCA is appealing for new homes for the felines surrendered.

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