Friday 16 November 2018

Ireland swelters amid confirmation a hosepipe ban is to be imposed in Dublin... from Monday

  • Some parts of Ireland may experience record temperatures on Friday
  • Those who flout the water ban will be subject to a fine of €125
  • Irish Water monitoring another 100 'at risk' areas
Cillian McGee (11) from Castleknock plays in the water at Portmarnock beach. Photo: Damien Eagers
Cillian McGee (11) from Castleknock plays in the water at Portmarnock beach. Photo: Damien Eagers
Paul Melia

Paul Melia

IRISH Water is to ban use of hosepipes for washing cars, filling paddling pools or watering the garden.

The utility has confirmed that a water conservation order will come into force from Monday across the Greater Dublin Area to protect supply and avoid the need for restrictions.

Those who flout the ban will be subject to a fine of €125.

The decision was made by the Irish Water board this afternoon.

Speaking about the legal move, Irish Water’s Corporate Affairs Manager Kate Gannon said,

"Imposing a Water Conservation Order is a measure that Irish Water now consider appropriate. It is essential that our water supply resources are conserved if we are to avoid restrictions and outages over the coming weeks and months.”

"The legislation actually requires us to demonstrate that there is an urgent need for the Water Conservation Order and that it can only be applied where and when it is necessary. Therefore we are considering such orders on a scheme by scheme basis.”

"We are really grateful for the measures that people have taken to conserve water so far and we hope that placing a Water Conservation Order will make people more mindful of their responsibilities and the impact their water usage is having on their neighbours and communities.”

"Irish Water is mindful of the impact that a Water Conservation Order might have on businesses and the tourist industry and for that reason the prohibition is mainly limited to domestic users with the exception of gardens."

It comes amid suggestions that some parts of Ireland may hit record highs in terms of temperature on Friday.

Yesterday was the hottest June day on record since 1976, with Shannon Airport reaching 32 degrees in the evening.

However, that record may be shortlived.

"There is a definite possibility that record will be broken," Met Eireann's Joanna Donnelly said earlier.

"We'll wait and see. Either way, it will be a sunny day. Temperatures elsewhere will be widely over 30 degrees and between about 25 and 28 degrees in eastern and southern coastal counties."

HOT: Sunbathers at Brittas Bay yesterday. Photo: Neil Carson
HOT: Sunbathers at Brittas Bay yesterday. Photo: Neil Carson

Tomorrow will see something of a change with the chance of showers along the west coast, while temperatures are expected to gradually decline into next week.

"Although temperatures still high, they'll be starting to decline somewhat. A little uncertainty lingering over Monday, but overall again a warm and sunny day.

"The further outlook into the early days of next week is for continuing warm weather but not as hot as it was this week, with more manageable temperatures. For today though, we're watching those highest temperatures."

Met Éireann has now extended the Status Yellow high temperature warning until 10pm Saturday night.

The hosepipe ban will be in place from Monday until July 31 next, but could be extended.

The prohibited use will apply to the use of water drawn through a hosepipe or similar for the purpose of watering a garden, cleaning a car or boat and filling or maintaining a domestic swimming or paddling pool – except when filled using hand-held containers filled from a tap.

It also applies to filling or maintaining a domestic or artificial pond , excluding fish ponds and domestic fountains.

The order applies across Dublin, Kildare, Meath and Wicklow but could be extended to more than 100 at-risk drinking water schemes across the country, where supplies are struggling to meet demand.

Irish Water’s Corporate Affairs Manager Kate Gannon said the move was “appropriate” to avoid restrictions and outages over the coming weeks and months.

“Imposing a water conservation order is a measure that Irish Water now consider appropriate. It is essential that our water supply resources are conserved if we are to avoid restrictions and outages over the coming weeks and months,” she said.

“The legislation actually requires us to demonstrate that there is an urgent need for the water conservation order and that it can only be applied where and when it is necessary. Therefore we are considering such orders on a scheme by scheme basis.”

She added that the public had taken steps to reduce consumption, and that the conservation order had been imposed on domestic users to protect businesses, including those in the tourism sector.

However, businesses cannot water gardens.

Usage in the Greater Dublin Area was marginally down overnight from yesterday at 607 million litres, but remains 5pc to 6pc above normal for the capital. 

While Irish Water can currently produce up to 610 million litres per day, at these levels all headroom is exhausted and the sources, particularly Pollaphuca reservoir on the Liffey is being drawn down at a rate that puts supplies at risk later in the summer, it added.

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