Thursday 19 September 2019

Protein insight may lead to better diabetes control

 

'Some 854,165 adults over 40 in the State are at increased risk of developing diabetes or already have the disease' (stock photo)
'Some 854,165 adults over 40 in the State are at increased risk of developing diabetes or already have the disease' (stock photo)
Eilish O'Regan

Eilish O'Regan

Obese patients who have type 2 diabetes may have better control of their disease due to naturally having a particular family of proteins, according to new research from Trinity College scientists.

Type 2 diabetes is a common condition that causes the level of sugar glucose in the blood to become too high.

However, scientists from the School of Medicine in Trinity College Dublin showed that patients with type 2 diabetes who have high levels of the protein, IL-36 cytokines, were found to have lower blood sugar levels.

The findings, in the journal 'Nature Communications', said IL-36 cytokines were members of a larger family of proteins known as the interleukin-1 family which have emerged as "central players in the development of obesity-related disease".

Some 854,165 adults over 40 in the State are at increased risk of developing diabetes or already have the disease.

The Trinity scientists have linked the protective effects of these proteins with their ability to alter the make-up of the intestinal microbiome.

The insight may be another important step in developing new treatments for diabetes.

Lead scientist Dr Patrick Walsh said: "This study has added to a substantial body of work which has revealed the important function of the broader interleukin-1 family as mediators of metabolic health and disease.

"Our findings have opened the door to a deeper investigation of how IL-36 cytokines impact on the development of such diseases in humans."

Irish Independent

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