Friday 17 August 2018

Mouthwash 'can trigger diabetes'

'Researchers at Harvard University found that people who used mouthwash twice a day were around 55pc more likely to develop diabetes, or dangerous blood-sugar spikes, within three years' (stock photo)
'Researchers at Harvard University found that people who used mouthwash twice a day were around 55pc more likely to develop diabetes, or dangerous blood-sugar spikes, within three years' (stock photo)
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

Mouthwash may seem a beneficial, or at least harmless, addition to a daily teeth-brushing routine.

But a new study suggests that swilling with anti-bacterial fluid could be killing helpful microbes which live in the mouth and protect against obesity and diabetes.

While mouthwash is supposed to target the bacteria which cause plaque and bad breath, in fact, it is indiscriminate, washing away beneficial strains.

Researchers at Harvard University found that people who used mouthwash twice a day were around 55pc more likely to develop diabetes, or dangerous blood-sugar spikes, within three years.

Over the study period, around 17pc of people developed diabetes or pre-diabetes, but that rose to 20pc for those using mouthwash once a day and 30pc for those who used it in both the morning and evening.

Irish Independent

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