Monday 16 September 2019

Irish consultants paid €41,000 more than their counterparts in the UK

The report said the destinations most likely to attract Irish consultants are in the UK, Australia, Canada and the United States (stock photo)
The report said the destinations most likely to attract Irish consultants are in the UK, Australia, Canada and the United States (stock photo)
Eilish O'Regan

Eilish O'Regan

Irish hospital consultants are better paid than their colleagues in the UK, earning an average salary of €170,000 for treatment of public patients.

Consultants in the UK have an average salary of €129,000, according to figures obtained by Donal de Buitléir and an expert team who examined the removal of private practice from public hospitals.

However, the average salary of a consultant in Canada is the equivalent of €196,000 and in Australia it is €198,000.

Doctors in the United States earn an average salary of €305,000, the figures show.

The salary for Irish doctors does not take into account the lucrative additional income the majority of them receive from treating private patients.

The report said the destinations most likely to attract Irish consultants are in the UK, Australia, Canada and the United States.

It is in favour of closing the €50,000 gap between consultants hired here since 2012 and their counterparts recruited before that date.

An OECD review commissioned as part of the analysis shows that across a sample of countries there is variation in the share of publicly employed doctors who are allowed to see private patients.

"It is very common in Ireland, Australia, the United Kingdom and Israel but limitations still exist," it said.

The number of salaried doctors with the right to bill patients independently is much more limited in France, where only 5pc of all doctors in public hospitals are allowed private practice.

As a share of expenditure on health, people in Ireland spend more on private health insurance than all other EU countries except Slovenia and just ahead of Cyprus.

Even in those countries where health insurance is used as a co-payment, such as France, Ireland's share is out of step.

Irish Independent

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