Saturday 21 September 2019

Ireland ranks second in EU for incidence of prostate cancer

The number of cases where men have no symptoms but have a PSA blood test, which can detect the early signs of an enlarged prostate, continues to rise. Photo: Getty
The number of cases where men have no symptoms but have a PSA blood test, which can detect the early signs of an enlarged prostate, continues to rise. Photo: Getty
Eilish O'Regan

Eilish O'Regan

Ireland ranks second in the EU for the incidence of prostate cancer and it is 12th highest for death rates from the disease, according to a report.

On average, 3,364 cases of prostate cancer were diagnosed annually from 2012 to 2014, according to the report by the National Cancer Registry.

"Following a period of sustained increase in incidence rates from 1994 until 2010, they have fallen in recent years, by on average 3.9pc per year during 2011-2014," it said.

Read more: Prostate cancer: Living with Ireland's everyman illness

The number of cases where men have no symptoms but have a PSA blood test, which can detect the early signs of an enlarged prostate, continues to rise.

"The number of men presenting with symptoms has remained largely unchanged, although numbers started declining in 2009, perhaps due to some cancers being picked up by screening, prior to symptoms occurring," it said.

Survival of prostate cancer patients has improved since the 1990s and is relatively high compared with other cancers. The five-year net survival averaged 91.1pc for 2009-2013 compared with 6.6pc between 1994 and 1998.

Apart from a slight decline in the late 1970s, mortality rates in Ireland increased from under eight deaths per 100,000 each year in the early 1950s to approximately 19 deaths per 100,000 a year in the mid-1990s.

However, since 1995, the mortality rates have been decreasing by on average 2.7pc annually. The report said the proportion of prostate cancer patients receiving tumour-directed treatment had remained fairly constant over time at about 76pc.

The use of radiotherapy has increased markedly, from 11pc of patients in 1994-2000 to 43pc of patients in 2008-2013. However, the proportion receiving surgery declined.

Irish Independent

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