Sunday 24 June 2018

Fake nails and polish are 'not a patient risk'- study

Women who use nail polish and false nails can heave a sigh of relief as new research shows they do not affect readings from devices used to monitor patients’ blood oxygen levels in hospital. Stock photo
Women who use nail polish and false nails can heave a sigh of relief as new research shows they do not affect readings from devices used to monitor patients’ blood oxygen levels in hospital. Stock photo
Eilish O'Regan

Eilish O'Regan

Women who use nail polish and false nails can heave a sigh of relief as new research shows they do not affect readings from devices used to monitor patients' blood oxygen levels in hospital.

The study by Dr James Purcell and colleagues at University College Cork, and South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital, Cork debunks several previous findings suggesting they were a risk.

The  study was presented to the Euroanaesthesia congress in Denmark.

Digital pulse oximetry devices are universally used to measure levels in patients.

However, there were concerns the readings they produce could be affected by treatments such as nail polish or acrylic nails.

The device fits around the fingertip including the nail, and the side facing the nail emits light which is detected by a sensor on the far side of the fingertip.

Changes in oxygen saturation affect the levels and types of medical intervention, as well as impacting patient monitoring in critical care and anaesthesia.

So determining whether nail treatments are a risk is crucial.

The study involved a questionnaire-based survey to clinical staff at four university hospitals to assess their knowledge and opinions on how nail treatments affect decisions.

Irish Independent

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