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Dublin man leaves €715k in will for Irish Cancer Society

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Katie Boyle, from Sligo, and Aoife McDarby, from Ranelagh, during Daffodil Day in the Garden of Hope at Iveagh Gardens, Dublin Photo: Collins

Katie Boyle, from Sligo, and Aoife McDarby, from Ranelagh, during Daffodil Day in the Garden of Hope at Iveagh Gardens, Dublin Photo: Collins

Collins Dublin, Gareth Chaney

Katie Boyle, from Sligo, and Aoife McDarby, from Ranelagh, during Daffodil Day in the Garden of Hope at Iveagh Gardens, Dublin Photo: Collins

One north Dublin man bequeathed a total of €715,000 including a house worth around €525,000 to the Irish Cancer Society (ICS) last year.

According to the Irish Cancer Society annual report, the society received a total of €3 million last year in bequests or legacies.

Along with bequeathing the €525,000 house, the man also bequeathed a cash donation of €190,000.

A spokeswoman for the ICS stated: “The next two largest bequests came from women who donated just over €400,000 and €300,000 respectively.”

The ICS had seven bequests over €100,000 and a further three donations between €75,000 and €60,000.

CEO of the society, Averil Power stated: “We are deeply appreciative of the generous amounts people have left us in their wills to help those affected by cancer.

She stated: “Ninety seven per cent of our funding comes from public donations. Without the generosity of donors like these, we simply couldn’t fund lifesaving research or provide vital services like night nursing. By leaving gifts in their wills, donors ensure we can be there for patients and their families when they need us and that no-one has to face cancer alone.”

The finances of the society are good health following the €6m bequest from Mrs Elizabeth O’Kelly from Stradbally, Co. Laois in 2017.

The €6m was part of €30m Mrs O’Kelly bequeathed to five charities.

At the end of last December the ICS’s total funds amounted to €24.4m and a note attached to the accounts states that during 2018, Mrs O’Kelly’s €6m bequest was transferred from the designated fund to the general unrestricted fund.

The note states: “The Board has decided that these funds should be used to meet the growing demand for cancer services and new initiatives under the five-year strategic plan 2020-2024.”

The annual report shows that the society’s fundraising income from campaigns totalling €12.63m last year - a minor dip from the €12.68m in 2017.

The ICS last year raised €3.25m from its annual daffodil day. Fundraising from ‘Movember’ declined from €779,000 to €584,000 while Shave or Dye and Dare to Care reduced from €310,000 to €174,000.

The income from corporate partnerships increased from €2.1m to 2.3m while individual giving reduced from €3m to €2.8m.

Overall, last year the ICS recorded income of €22.32m while its expenditure totalled €19.9m - including €3m on night nursing - resulting in a surplus of €2.2m for the year.

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Support: Averil Power, CEO of the Irish Cancer Society. Picture: Andres Poveda

Support: Averil Power, CEO of the Irish Cancer Society. Picture: Andres Poveda

Support: Averil Power, CEO of the Irish Cancer Society. Picture: Andres Poveda

Staff costs at the ICS last year totalled €7.6m that included pay of €125,000 to Ms Power. Total pay to seven key management personnel totalled €826,382.

The report records that 150 people are diagnosed with cancer every day and that every three minutes someone is told that they have cancer.

In her report, Ms Power states: “When Daffodil Day first began in 1986, just three out of ten Irish people survived their cancer diagnosis. Today, six out of ten do. This is thanks in no small part to advancements in cancer research and services we have helped to deliver with the generous support of our donors.”

Online Editors